Signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis

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Article on signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis.

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7 p.

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Chory, Joanne; Cook, R. K.; Dixon, R. A.; Elich, Tedd; Li, H. M.; Lopez, E. et al. October 30, 1995.

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Article on signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis.

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7 p.

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Abstract: All metazoan cells are able to make decisions about cell division or cellular differentiation based, in part, on environmental cues. Accordingly, cells express receptor systems that allow them to detect the presence of hormones, growth factors and other signals that manipulate the regulatory processes of the cell. In plants, an unusual signal - light - is required for the induction and regulation of many developmental processes. Past physiological and molecular studies have revealed the variety and complexity of plant responses to light but until recently very little was known about the mechanisms of those responses. Two major breakthroughs have allowed the identification of some photoreceptor signalling intermediates: the identification of photoreceptor and signal transduction mutants in Arabidopsis, and the development of single-cell microinjection assays in which outcomes of photoreceptor signalling can be visualized. Here, we review recent genetic advances which support the notion that light responses are not simply endpoints of linear signal transduction pathways, but are the result of the integration of a variety of input signals through a complex network of interacting signalling components.

© 1995 The Royal Society.

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  • Philosophical Transactions B, 1995, Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry (Great Britain), pp. 59-65

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  • Publication Title: Philosophical Transactions B
  • Volume: 350
  • Issue: 1331
  • Page Start: 59
  • Page End: 65
  • Pages: 7
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • October 30, 1995

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  • July 9, 2015, 6:19 a.m.

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Chory, Joanne; Cook, R. K.; Dixon, R. A.; Elich, Tedd; Li, H. M.; Lopez, E. et al. Signal-transduction pathways controlling light-regulated development in Arabidopsis, article, October 30, 1995; [Cambridge, England]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc674041/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.