Transitioning aluminum clad spent fuels from wet to interim dry storage

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Description

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns several hundred metric tons of aluminum clad, spent nuclear fuel and target assemblies. The vast majority of these irradiated assemblies are currently stored in water basins that were designed and operated for short term fuel cooling prior to fuel reprocessing. Recent DOE decisions to severely limit the reprocessing option have significantly lengthened the time of storage, thus increasing the tendency for corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding and the underlying core material. The portent of continued corrosion, coupled with the age of existing wet storage facilities and the cost of ... continued below

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6 p.

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Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Sindelar, R.L. & Peacock, H.B. Jr. December 31, 1994.

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Description

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns several hundred metric tons of aluminum clad, spent nuclear fuel and target assemblies. The vast majority of these irradiated assemblies are currently stored in water basins that were designed and operated for short term fuel cooling prior to fuel reprocessing. Recent DOE decisions to severely limit the reprocessing option have significantly lengthened the time of storage, thus increasing the tendency for corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding and the underlying core material. The portent of continued corrosion, coupled with the age of existing wet storage facilities and the cost of continuing basin operations, including necessary upgrades to meet current facility standards, may force the DOE to transition these wet stored, aluminum clad spent fuels to interim dry storage. The facilities for interim dry storage have not been developed, partially because fuel storage requirements and specifications for acceptable fuel forms are lacking. In spite of the lack of both facilities and specifications, current plans are to dry store fuels for approximately 40 to 60 years or until firm decisions are developed for final fuel disposition. The transition of the aluminum clad fuels from wet to interim dry storage will require a sequence of drying and canning operations which will include selected fuel preparations such as vacuum drying and conditioning of the storage atmosphere. Laboratory experiments and review of the available literature have demonstrated that successful interim dry storage may also require the use of fuel and canister cleaning or rinsing techniques that preclude, or at least minimize, the potential for the accumulation of chloride and other potentially deleterious ions in the dry storage environment. This paper summarizes an evaluation of the impact of fuel transitioning techniques on the potential for corrosion induced degradation of fuel forms during interim dry storage.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE95006455

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  • International high-level radioactive waste management conference: progress toward understanding, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 1-5 May 1995

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  • Other: DE95006455
  • Report No.: WSRC-MS--94-0617
  • Report No.: CONF-950570--12
  • Grant Number: AC09-89SR18035
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 26700
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc672154

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  • December 31, 1994

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Feb. 9, 2016, 7:15 p.m.

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Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Sindelar, R.L. & Peacock, H.B. Jr. Transitioning aluminum clad spent fuels from wet to interim dry storage, article, December 31, 1994; Aiken, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc672154/: accessed August 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.