Estimates of fire environments in ship holds containing radioactive material packages

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Fire environments that occur on cargo ships differ significantly from the fire environments found in land transport. Cargo ships typically carry a large amount of flammable fuel for propulsion and shipboard power, and may transport large quantities of flammable cargo. As a result, sea mode transport accident records contain instances of long lasting and intense fires. Since Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) casks are not carried on tankers with large flammable cargoes, most of these dramatic, long burning fires are not relevant threats, and transport studies must concentrate on those fires that are most likely to occur. By regulation, INF casks ... continued below

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7 p.

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Koski, J.A.; Cole, J.K.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. & Wix, S.D. December 31, 1995.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Fire environments that occur on cargo ships differ significantly from the fire environments found in land transport. Cargo ships typically carry a large amount of flammable fuel for propulsion and shipboard power, and may transport large quantities of flammable cargo. As a result, sea mode transport accident records contain instances of long lasting and intense fires. Since Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) casks are not carried on tankers with large flammable cargoes, most of these dramatic, long burning fires are not relevant threats, and transport studies must concentrate on those fires that are most likely to occur. By regulation, INF casks must be separated from flammable cargoes by a fire-resistant, liquid-tight partition. This makes a fire in an adjacent ship hold the most likely fire threat. The large size of a cargo ship relative to any spent nuclear fuel casks on board, however, may permit a severe, long lasting fire to occur with little or no thermal impact on the casks. Although some flammable materials such as shipping boxes or container floors may exist in the same hold with the cask, the amount of fuel available may not provide a significant threat to the massive transport casks used for radioactive materials. This shipboard fire situation differs significantly from the regulatory conditions specified in 10 CFR 71 for a fully engulfing pool fire. To learn more about the differences, a series of simple thermal analyses has been completed to estimate cask behavior in likely marine and land thermal accident situations. While the calculations are based on several conservative assumptions, and are only preliminary, they illustrate that casks are likely to heat much more slowly in shipboard hold fires than in an open pool fire. The calculations also reinforce the basic regulatory concept that for radioactive materials, the shipping cask, not the ship, is the primary protection barrier to consider.

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7 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE96003643

Source

  • PATRAM `95: 11. international conference on packaging and transportation of radioactive materials, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 3-8 Dec 1995

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  • Other: DE96003643
  • Report No.: SAND--95-0081C
  • Report No.: CONF-951203--18
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 171370
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc671964

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  • December 31, 1995

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • April 13, 2016, 1:45 p.m.

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Koski, J.A.; Cole, J.K.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. & Wix, S.D. Estimates of fire environments in ship holds containing radioactive material packages, article, December 31, 1995; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc671964/: accessed October 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.