Nucleation and growth processes of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

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Description

This project seeks to gain enhanced understanding of the rate of formation and growth of new particles and of cloud droplets as a function of pertinent controlling atmospheric variables, thereby permitting accurate representation of these processes in climate models. Aerosol size distributions are shaped by complex nucleation and growth and mixing processes that are difficult to represent in models, due to the need to accurately represent the evaporation/growth kinetics for each of the billions of discrete cluster sizes in the growth sequence, ranging from molecular clusters to particles of radius of several tenths of a micrometer or greater. A potentially ... continued below

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5 p.

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Schwartz, S.E. & McGraw, R.L. November 1, 1995.

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Description

This project seeks to gain enhanced understanding of the rate of formation and growth of new particles and of cloud droplets as a function of pertinent controlling atmospheric variables, thereby permitting accurate representation of these processes in climate models. Aerosol size distributions are shaped by complex nucleation and growth and mixing processes that are difficult to represent in models, due to the need to accurately represent the evaporation/growth kinetics for each of the billions of discrete cluster sizes in the growth sequence, ranging from molecular clusters to particles of radius of several tenths of a micrometer or greater. A potentially very powerful means of solving this problem may be given by the method of moments (MOM), which tracks the time dependence of just the lower-order radial moments of the size distribution without requiring knowledge of the distribution itself.

Physical Description

5 p.

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OSTI as DE96006779

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  • NASA aerosol interdisciplinary program workshop, Columbia, MD (United States), 30 Oct - 1 Nov 1995

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  • Other: DE96006779
  • Report No.: BNL--62641
  • Report No.: CONF-9510305--2
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH00016
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 206951
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc671695

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  • November 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 5 p.m.

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Schwartz, S.E. & McGraw, R.L. Nucleation and growth processes of atmospheric aerosols and clouds, article, November 1, 1995; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc671695/: accessed September 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.