NMR spectroscopic investigations of surface and interlayer species on minerals, clays and other oxides

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The behavior of chemical species adsorbed on solid surfaces and exchanged into clay interlayers plays a significant role in controlling many natural and technologically important processes, including rheological behavior, catalysis, plant growth, transport in natural pore fluids and those near anthropogenic hazardous waste sites, and water-mineral interaction. Adsorption and exchange reactions have been the focus of intense study for many decades. Only more recently, however, have there been extensive spectroscopic studies of surface species. Among the spectroscopic methods useful for studying surface and exchanged species (e.g., infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy [XPS] and X-ray absorption spectroscopy [XAS]), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ... continued below

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18 p.

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Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Yeongkyoo Kim; Weiss, C. A. & Cygan, R. T. July 1, 1996.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Kirkpatrick, R. J.
  • Yeongkyoo Kim Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Department of Geology
  • Weiss, C. A. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Structures Laboratory
  • Cygan, R. T. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

The behavior of chemical species adsorbed on solid surfaces and exchanged into clay interlayers plays a significant role in controlling many natural and technologically important processes, including rheological behavior, catalysis, plant growth, transport in natural pore fluids and those near anthropogenic hazardous waste sites, and water-mineral interaction. Adsorption and exchange reactions have been the focus of intense study for many decades. Only more recently, however, have there been extensive spectroscopic studies of surface species. Among the spectroscopic methods useful for studying surface and exchanged species (e.g., infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy [XPS] and X-ray absorption spectroscopy [XAS]), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has the considerable advantage of providing not only structural information via the chemical shift and quadrupole coupling constant but dynamical information in the Hz-mHz range via lineshape analysis and relaxation rate measurements. It is also possible to obtain data in the presence of a separate fluid phase, which is essential for many applications. This paper illustrates the range of applications of NMR methods to surface and exchanged species through review of recent work from our laboratory on Cs in clay interlayers and Cs, Na and phosphate adsorbed on oxide surfaces. The substrate materials used for these experiments and our long-term objectives are related to problems of geochemical interest, but the principals and techniques are of fundamental interest and applicable to a wide range of technological problems.

Physical Description

18 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96011976

Source

  • 1. international alloy conference and the 1st biennial conference on the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of alloy systems, Athens (Greece), 16-21 Jun 1996

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  • Other: DE96011976
  • Report No.: SAND--96-1629C
  • Report No.: CONF-960628--1
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 266921
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc671379

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • July 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Oct. 3, 2017, 4:28 p.m.

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Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Yeongkyoo Kim; Weiss, C. A. & Cygan, R. T. NMR spectroscopic investigations of surface and interlayer species on minerals, clays and other oxides, article, July 1, 1996; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc671379/: accessed October 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.