A whole building demonstration of re-cover over an existing wet roof

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Roof re-cover, the practice of installing a new roof over an existing failed roof, has become commonplace. The 1994 National Roofing Contractors Annual Roofing Survey reported that approximately 33% of current reroofing activity is re-cover. Market trends suggest that re-cover will become an increasingly more popular option. Moisture in the failed roof complicates the decision whether or not to re-cover and how to do the recover if that is the decision. If the root to be re-covered contains moisture that will not be removed during reroofing, this moisture must be able to escape from the roof system. Otherwise, moisture entrapped ... continued below

Physical Description

26 p.

Creation Information

Desjarlais, A.O.; Petrie, T.W.; Christian, J.E.; McLain, H.A. & Childs, P.W. December 31, 1995.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Roof re-cover, the practice of installing a new roof over an existing failed roof, has become commonplace. The 1994 National Roofing Contractors Annual Roofing Survey reported that approximately 33% of current reroofing activity is re-cover. Market trends suggest that re-cover will become an increasingly more popular option. Moisture in the failed roof complicates the decision whether or not to re-cover and how to do the recover if that is the decision. If the root to be re-covered contains moisture that will not be removed during reroofing, this moisture must be able to escape from the roof system. Otherwise, moisture entrapped in the roofing system may eventually lead to the mechanical failure of fasteners and the roof deck, especially if it is metal. In 1991, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) surveyed its own roofing inventory and found that 164 buildings or 70% of the laboratory roof area needed reroofing. Because of the high cost of tear off and replacement, an alterative was sought. This paper describes the procedure employed to determine the suitability of a particular roof system on a laboratory building for re-covering. The procedure involves the use of field diagnostics, laboratory experiments and numerical simulations that demonstrate that the particular roof type can be re-covered. Furthermore, the building and roof system have been monitored for approximately 16 months after re-cover. The monitoring results are compared to the numerical simulations and demonstrate that the roof system is drying and that the reroofing strategy that they used is cost-effective.

Physical Description

26 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96005988

Source

  • 11. conference on roofing technology, science and technology: the basis for improved roofing, Gaithersburg, MD (United States), 21-22 Sep 1995

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE96005988
  • Report No.: CONF-9509310--1
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 201740
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc670811

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • December 31, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Jan. 21, 2016, 1:48 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Desjarlais, A.O.; Petrie, T.W.; Christian, J.E.; McLain, H.A. & Childs, P.W. A whole building demonstration of re-cover over an existing wet roof, article, December 31, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc670811/: accessed December 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.