Yuma proving grounds automatic UXO detection using biomorphic robots

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The current variety and dispersion of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) is a daunting technological problem for current sensory and extraction techniques. The bottom line is that the only way to insure a live UXO has been found and removed is to step on it. As this is an upsetting proposition for biological organisms like animals, farmers, or Yuma field personnel, this paper details a non-biological approach to developing inexpensive, automatic machines that will find, tag, and may eventually remove UXO from a variety of terrains by several proposed methods. The Yuma proving grounds (Arizona) has been pelted with bombs, mines, missiles, ... continued below

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13 p.

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Tilden, M.W. July 1, 1996.

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Description

The current variety and dispersion of Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) is a daunting technological problem for current sensory and extraction techniques. The bottom line is that the only way to insure a live UXO has been found and removed is to step on it. As this is an upsetting proposition for biological organisms like animals, farmers, or Yuma field personnel, this paper details a non-biological approach to developing inexpensive, automatic machines that will find, tag, and may eventually remove UXO from a variety of terrains by several proposed methods. The Yuma proving grounds (Arizona) has been pelted with bombs, mines, missiles, and shells since the 1940s. The idea of automatic machines that can clean up after such testing is an old one but as yet unrealized because of the daunting cost, power and complexity requirements of capable robot mechanisms. A researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory has invented and developed a new variety of living robots that are solar powered, legged, autonomous, adaptive to massive damage, and very inexpensive. This technology, called Nervous Networks (Nv), allows for the creation of capable walking mechanisms (known as Biomorphic robots, or Biomechs for short) that rather than work from task principles use instead a survival-based design philosophy. This allows Nv based machines to continue doing work even after multiple limbs and sensors have been removed or damaged, and to dynamically negotiate complex terrains as an emergent property of their operation (fighting to proceed, as it were). They are not programmed, and indeed, the twelve transistor Nv controller keeps their electronic cost well below that of most pocket radios. It is suspected that advanced forms of these machines in huge numbers may be an interesting, capable solution to the problem of general and specific UXO identification, tagging, and removal.

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13 p.

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OSTI as DE96012659

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  • 1996 test technology symposium, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States), Jun 1996

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  • Other: DE96012659
  • Report No.: LA-UR--96-1995
  • Report No.: CONF-9606234--1
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 266634
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc669969

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  • July 1, 1996

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Feb. 29, 2016, 8:20 p.m.

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Tilden, M.W. Yuma proving grounds automatic UXO detection using biomorphic robots, article, July 1, 1996; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669969/: accessed August 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.