Estimating dispersion from a tornado vortex and mesocyclone

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Description

Atmospheric dispersion modeling is required to ensure that a postulated breach in radionuclide storage containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from a tornado strike of Fujita-scale intensity F2 or higher will not result in an unacceptable dose to individuals. Fujita-scale tornado descriptions are included in Appendix A of this report. Dispersion models previously used at SRS for estimating dispersion following a tornado strike were developed by D.W. Pepper in 1975 (DP-1387, Dispersion of Small Particles) and H.R. Haynes and D.W. Taylor in 1983 (DPST-82-982, Estimating Doses from Tornado Winds). Research conducted in 1983 on the formation and evolution of ... continued below

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37 p.

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Weber, A.H. & Hunter, C.H. June 1, 1996.

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Description

Atmospheric dispersion modeling is required to ensure that a postulated breach in radionuclide storage containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from a tornado strike of Fujita-scale intensity F2 or higher will not result in an unacceptable dose to individuals. Fujita-scale tornado descriptions are included in Appendix A of this report. Dispersion models previously used at SRS for estimating dispersion following a tornado strike were developed by D.W. Pepper in 1975 (DP-1387, Dispersion of Small Particles) and H.R. Haynes and D.W. Taylor in 1983 (DPST-82-982, Estimating Doses from Tornado Winds). Research conducted in 1983 on the formation and evolution of tornadic thunderstorms has lead to a more complete understanding of the tornado vortex and associated persistent updraft and downdraft regions within the parent thunderstorm. To ensure that appropriate, contemporary methods are used for safety analysis, the Pepper model and the Haynes and Taylor model were evaluated with respect to current knowledge of circulations within tornadic thunderstorms. Pepper`s model is complex numerically but contains most of the desired physical parameterizations. Haynes and Taylor`s model is used with the Puff-Plume model (an emergency response model on the Weather INformation and Display System at SRS) and has provisions for radionuclide deposition and rainout. Haynes and Taylor assumed heavy rain following the tornado for a period of ten minutes, followed by a lighter rain for another ten minutes, then no rain for the period when the material is transported to 100 km downwind. However, neither model incorporates the effects of a nearby thunderstorm downdraft.

Physical Description

37 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE96011789

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  • Other Information: PBD: Jun 1996

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  • Other: DE96011789
  • Report No.: WSRC-TR--94-0386-Rev.1
  • Grant Number: AC09-89SR18035
  • DOI: 10.2172/251651 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 251651
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc669867

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Creation Date

  • June 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Feb. 9, 2016, 5:33 p.m.

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Weber, A.H. & Hunter, C.H. Estimating dispersion from a tornado vortex and mesocyclone, report, June 1, 1996; Aiken, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669867/: accessed November 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.