Litter quality and decomposition rates of foliar litter produced under CO{sub 2} enrichment

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Decomposition of senesced plant material is one of two critical processes linking above- and below-ground components of nutrient cycles. As such, it is a key area of concern in understanding and predicting ecosystem responses to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Just as root acquisition of nutrients from soils represents the major pathway for nutrient movement from the soil to vegetation, decomposition serves as the major path of return to the soil. For any given ecosystem, a long-term shift in decomposition rates could alter nutrient cycling rates and potentially change the structure, function, and even the persistence of that ecosystem type within ... continued below

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34 p.

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O`Neill, E.G. & Norby, R.J. December 31, 1993.

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Description

Decomposition of senesced plant material is one of two critical processes linking above- and below-ground components of nutrient cycles. As such, it is a key area of concern in understanding and predicting ecosystem responses to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Just as root acquisition of nutrients from soils represents the major pathway for nutrient movement from the soil to vegetation, decomposition serves as the major path of return to the soil. For any given ecosystem, a long-term shift in decomposition rates could alter nutrient cycling rates and potentially change the structure, function, and even the persistence of that ecosystem type within a given region. There is wide-spread concern that decomposition processes would be altered in an enriched-CO{sub 2} world. What is lacking presently is sufficient experimental data at the ecosystem level to determine whether these concerns have merit. Two issues are discussed in this article: effects of carbon dioxide enrichement on foliar litter quality and subsequent effects on decomposition rates. The focus is primarily on nitrogen because in many terrestrial ecosystems, nitrogen is the major nutrient limiting plant growth and experimental results from diverse ecosystem types have demonstrated that nitrogen concentrations are consistently reduced in green foliage produced at elevated carbon dioxide. Methodological questions are also discussed.

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34 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96008454

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  • International geosphere biosphere programme (IGBP) core project global change and terrestrial ecosystems (GCTE) symposium on terrestrial ecosystem response to Elevated CO{sub 2}, Miniato (Italy), 18-21 Oct 1993

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  • Other: DE96008454
  • Report No.: CONF-9310455--1
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 219484
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc669796

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • December 31, 1993

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Jan. 19, 2016, 7:38 p.m.

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O`Neill, E.G. & Norby, R.J. Litter quality and decomposition rates of foliar litter produced under CO{sub 2} enrichment, article, December 31, 1993; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669796/: accessed December 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.