Site specific endonucleases for human genome mapping. Final report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1994

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Current large scale genome mapping methodology suffers from a lack of tools for generating specific DNA fragments in the megabase size range. While technology such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis can resolve DNA fragments greater than 10 megabases in size, current methods for cleaving mammalian DNA using bacterial restriction enzymes are incapable of producing such fragments. Though several multidimensional approaches are underway to overcome this limitation, there currently is no single step procedure to generate specific DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range. In order to overcome these limitations, we proposed to develop a family of site-specific endonucleases capable ... continued below

Physical Description

Medium: P; Size: 34 p.

Creation Information

Knoche, K.; Selman, S. & Hung, L. June 1, 1994.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Current large scale genome mapping methodology suffers from a lack of tools for generating specific DNA fragments in the megabase size range. While technology such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis can resolve DNA fragments greater than 10 megabases in size, current methods for cleaving mammalian DNA using bacterial restriction enzymes are incapable of producing such fragments. Though several multidimensional approaches are underway to overcome this limitation, there currently is no single step procedure to generate specific DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range. In order to overcome these limitations, we proposed to develop a family of site-specific endonucleases capable of generating DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range in a single step. Additionally, we proposed to accomplish this by relaxing the specificity of a very-rare cutting intron-encoded endonucleases, I-Ppo I, and potentially using the process as a model for development of other enzymes. Our research has uncovered a great deal of information about intron-encoded endonucleases. We have found that I-Ppo I has a remarkable ability to tolerate degeneracy within its recognition sequence, and we have shown that the recognition sequence is larger than 15 base pairs. These findings suggest that a detailed study of the mechanism by which intron-encoded endonucleases recognize their target sequences should provide new sights into DNA-protein interactions; this had led to a continuation of the study of I-Ppo I in Dr. Raines` laboratory and we expect a more detailed understanding of the mechanism of I-Ppo I action to result.

Physical Description

Medium: P; Size: 34 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96005036

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: Jun 1994

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE96005036
  • Report No.: DOE/ER/81252--2
  • Grant Number: FG02-91ER81252
  • DOI: 10.2172/188888 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 188888
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc669597

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • June 1, 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Feb. 1, 2016, 9:22 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Knoche, K.; Selman, S. & Hung, L. Site specific endonucleases for human genome mapping. Final report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1994, report, June 1, 1994; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669597/: accessed April 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.