Assessing the interaction of mountain waves and katabatic flows using a mesoscale model

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This paper has two main purposes. The first is to evaluate the interaction of two common complex terrain meteorological phenomena, katabatic flow and mountain waves. Although occasionally investigated together, generally, the large body of literature regarding them has treated each individually. The second purpose is to show the reader the utility of extracting high time resolution data sets of (1) standard meteorological variables, and (2) seldom used, components of the model equations. Using such time series, significant variability is found in the evolving, clear sky, nocturnal boundary layer, when meteorological variability is generally considered to be at its lowest point ... continued below

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6 p.

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Poulos, G.S.; Bossert, J.E.; McKee, T.B. & Pielke, A. July 1, 1996.

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Description

This paper has two main purposes. The first is to evaluate the interaction of two common complex terrain meteorological phenomena, katabatic flow and mountain waves. Although occasionally investigated together, generally, the large body of literature regarding them has treated each individually. The second purpose is to show the reader the utility of extracting high time resolution data sets of (1) standard meteorological variables, and (2) seldom used, components of the model equations. Using such time series, significant variability is found in the evolving, clear sky, nocturnal boundary layer, when meteorological variability is generally considered to be at its lowest point diurnally. The approach is to use results from three, 3-d, realistic topography simulations produced by the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). RAMS is a primitive equation mesoscale model formulated in {sigma} coordinates. The model is set up with five nested grids that focus on Eldorado Canyon, which is embedded in the Front Range slope of Colorado. On the finest grid {Delta}x = {Delta}y = 400 m and {Delta}z = 20 m for the lowest 400 m above ground level (AGL). The three simulations were: (1) a realistic simulation; (2) the same as (1) but without radiative forcing (referred to as mountain wave only or MWO) and (3) the same as (1) but without boundary nudging and no initial winds (referred to as katabatic flow only or KFO). The case night is 3--4 Sep 1993 from the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) 1993 field program near Rocky Flats, Colorado. Both mountain waves and katabatic flows were occurring on this night.

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6 p.

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OSTI as DE96012643

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  • 15. weather analysis and forecasting, Norfolk, VA (United States), 19-23 Aug 1996

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  • Other: DE96012643
  • Report No.: LA-UR--96-2102
  • Report No.: CONF-9608103--1
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 266657
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc669401

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  • July 1, 1996

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Feb. 29, 2016, 1:13 p.m.

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Poulos, G.S.; Bossert, J.E.; McKee, T.B. & Pielke, A. Assessing the interaction of mountain waves and katabatic flows using a mesoscale model, article, July 1, 1996; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669401/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.