Constraints on target chamber first wall and target designs that will enable NIF debris shields to survive

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The National Ignition Facility target chamber interior materials and target designs themselves have to be compatible with survival of the final-optics debris shields. To meet the planned maintenance and refinishing rate, the contamination of the debris shields cannot exceed about 1 nm equivalent thickness per shot of total material. This implies that the target mass must be limited to no more than 1 gram and the ablated mass released to the chamber from all other components must not exceed 3 grams. In addition, the targets themselves must either completely vaporize or send any minor amounts of shrapnel towards the chamber ... continued below

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Hibbard,W.; Burnham, A. K.; Curran, D. R; Genin, F. Y.; Gerassimenko, M.; Latkowski, J. F. et al. July 9, 1998.

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The National Ignition Facility target chamber interior materials and target designs themselves have to be compatible with survival of the final-optics debris shields. To meet the planned maintenance and refinishing rate, the contamination of the debris shields cannot exceed about 1 nm equivalent thickness per shot of total material. This implies that the target mass must be limited to no more than 1 gram and the ablated mass released to the chamber from all other components must not exceed 3 grams. In addition, the targets themselves must either completely vaporize or send any minor amounts of shrapnel towards the chamber waist to prevent excessive cratering of the debris shields. The constraints on the first-wall ablation require that it be louvered to provide passive collection of remobilized contamination, because the expected target debris will remobilize at a rate fast enough to require cleaning every 3 weeks, about three times more frequent than possible with planned robotics. Furthermore, a comparison of ablatants from B{sub 4}C and stainless-steel louvers suggests that remobilization of target debris by x rays will be greater than of the base material in both cases, thereby reducing the performance advantage of clean B{sub 4}C over much-cheaper stainless steel. Neutronics calculations indicate that activation of thin Ni-free stainless steel is not a significant source of maintenance personnel radiation dose. Consequently, the most attractive first wall design consists of stainless-steel louvers. Evaluation of various unconverted-light beam dump designs indicates that stainless steel louvers generate no more debris than other materials, so one single design can serve as both first wall and beam dumps, eliminating beam steering restrictions caused by size and location of the beam dumps. One reservation is that the allowable contamination rate of the debris shield is not yet completely understood.

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1.6 Megabytes pages

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  • Third International Conference on Solid State Lasers for Application (SSLA) to Inertial Confinement Fusion, Monterey, CA (US), 06/07/1998--06/12/1998

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-129707
  • Report No.: 39DP02000
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 2769
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc669141

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • July 9, 1998

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • May 5, 2016, 9:09 p.m.

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Hibbard,W.; Burnham, A. K.; Curran, D. R; Genin, F. Y.; Gerassimenko, M.; Latkowski, J. F. et al. Constraints on target chamber first wall and target designs that will enable NIF debris shields to survive, article, July 9, 1998; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc669141/: accessed October 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.