Commodity clusters: Performance comparison between PC`s and workstations

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Workstation clusters were originally developed as a way to leverage the better cost basis of UNIX workstations to perform computations previously handled only by relatively more expensive supercomputers. Commodity workstation clusters take this evolutionary process one step further by replacing equivalent proprietary workstation functionality with less expensive PC technology. As PC technology encroaches on proprietary UNIX workstation vendor markets, these vendors will see a declining share of the overall market. As technology advances continue, the ability to upgrade a workstations performance plays a large role in cost analysis. For example, a major upgrade to a typical UNIX workstation means replacing ... continued below

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25 p.

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Carter, R.; Laroco, J. & Armstrong, R. March 1, 1996.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Livermore, California

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Description

Workstation clusters were originally developed as a way to leverage the better cost basis of UNIX workstations to perform computations previously handled only by relatively more expensive supercomputers. Commodity workstation clusters take this evolutionary process one step further by replacing equivalent proprietary workstation functionality with less expensive PC technology. As PC technology encroaches on proprietary UNIX workstation vendor markets, these vendors will see a declining share of the overall market. As technology advances continue, the ability to upgrade a workstations performance plays a large role in cost analysis. For example, a major upgrade to a typical UNIX workstation means replacing the whole machine. As major revisions to the UNIX vendor`s product line come out, brand new systems are introduced. IBM compatibles, however, are modular by design, and nothing need to be replaced except the components that are truly improved. The DAISy cluster, for example, is about to undergo a major upgrade from 90MHz Pentiums to 200MHz Pentium Pros. All of the memory -- the system`s largest expense -- and disks, power supply, etc., can be reused. As a result, commodity workstation clusters ought to gain an increasingly large share of the distributed computing market.

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25 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96006816

Source

  • 5. IEEE international symposium on high-performance distributed computing, Syracuse, NY (United States), 6-9 Aug 1996

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  • Other: DE96006816
  • Report No.: SAND--96-8536C
  • Report No.: CONF-960835--1
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 251351
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc668373

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • March 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • April 12, 2016, 8:24 p.m.

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Carter, R.; Laroco, J. & Armstrong, R. Commodity clusters: Performance comparison between PC`s and workstations, article, March 1, 1996; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668373/: accessed November 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.