The ZOOM Fermilab physics class libraries

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Several years ago, the two major collider experiments at Fermilab (D#31; and CDF) decided that new software development for Run II will be largely done in C++. The run is slated to start in 1.5 years, an aggressive time frame for a major change in development language and style. If despite the transition each experiment (and sometimes multiple groups within an experiment) were to develop each needed mod- ule, the C++ strategy would not be advantageous. Thus it was deemed useful to have a library development group speci#12;cally responsive to Run II needs. This Fer- milab Physics Class Library Task ... continued below

Physical Description

162 Kilobytes

Creation Information

Mark Fischler, Walter Brown, Philippe Canal and John Marraffino November 1, 1998.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Several years ago, the two major collider experiments at Fermilab (D#31; and CDF) decided that new software development for Run II will be largely done in C++. The run is slated to start in 1.5 years, an aggressive time frame for a major change in development language and style. If despite the transition each experiment (and sometimes multiple groups within an experiment) were to develop each needed mod- ule, the C++ strategy would not be advantageous. Thus it was deemed useful to have a library development group speci#12;cally responsive to Run II needs. This Fer- milab Physics Class Library Task Force (ZOOM) would also expand the core of C++ expertise available for Fermilab physicists to draw upon. C++ di#11;ers from Fortran in that the for common use of routines and libraries is greater. But this potential is not realized automatically. Unless coordina- tion issues are considered from the start, utilities produced by one group generally do mot meet the needs of other groups|and each group ends up creating independant software. To help increase code sharing, the centralized ZOOM task force must: Actively pursue outside (commercial and free-ware) packages. If ZOOM can verify that package X meets some needs in a sensible manner, then people can gravitate to that and not expend valuable development time. Act as a core for joint develpment of packages needed by both experiments. Develop relevant packages of su#14;ciently high quality as to overcome the natu- ral reluctance of highly skilled physicists to rely on code developed by others. This means more extensive design thought and testing work than might be practical for some groups. Participate in cooperation with HEP groups outside the FNAL community, to acquire tools suitable for the Fermilab e#11;orts. Of particular concern are areas where standardization is important, and thus a single product is more valuable than two, even discounting any savings in e#11;ort. We must bring the ability to contribute some packages and the willingness to accept others from the HEP community. ZOOM is answerable to the Run II Steering Committee, representing CDF, D#31;, and the Computing Division. As implied above, the mission is to acquire, adapt, or (if necessary) develop modules that will be of use to both experiments. The products are organized into \packages" each of which contain|for a given platform|a library for linking with user code, and its sources (if not commercial) and build scripts. Multiple versions of the library may be present: for example, builds can be done with or without C++ exception handling enabled. The ZOOM software, including sources and documentation, can be found on links from the homepage www.fnal.gov/docs/working-groups/fpcltf/fpcltf.html. In addition, directory trees containing source and binary libraries are kept on the D#31;, CDF, and central Computing Division systems, so Run II users and others can link to the built libraries. ZOOM documentation is mostly html-based.

Physical Description

162 Kilobytes

Source

  • International Conference on Computing in High Energy Physics (CHEP '98), Chicago, Illinois, August 31 - September 4, 1998

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE00002167
  • Report No.: FERMILAB-Conf-98/322
  • Grant Number: NONE
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 2167
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc668366

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • November 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 18, 2016, 3:30 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 9

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Mark Fischler, Walter Brown, Philippe Canal and John Marraffino. The ZOOM Fermilab physics class libraries, article, November 1, 1998; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc668366/: accessed September 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.