Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications

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Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by ... continued below

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149 p.

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Rodriguez, M.M.S. April 1, 1995.

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  • Rodriguez, M.M.S. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

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Description

Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by the accuracy of the trial wave function`s nodal structure. Efforts in the group have given great emphasis to finding optimized wave functions for the QMC calculations. Little work had been done by systematically looking at a family of systems to see how the best wave functions evolve with system size. In this work the author presents a study of trial wave functions for C, CH, C{sub 2}H and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The goal is to study how to build wave functions for larger systems by accumulating knowledge from the wave functions of its fragments as well as gaining some knowledge on the usefulness of multi-reference wave functions. In a MC calculation of a heavy atom, for reasonable time steps most moves for core electrons are rejected. For this reason true equilibration is rarely achieved. A method proposed by Batrouni and Reynolds modifies the way the simulation is performed without altering the final steady-state solution. It introduces an acceleration matrix chosen so that all coordinates (i.e., of core and valence electrons) propagate at comparable speeds. A study of the results obtained using their proposed matrix suggests that it may not be the optimum choice. In this work the author has found that the desired mixing of coordinates between core and valence electrons is not achieved when using this matrix. A bibliography of 175 references is included.

Physical Description

149 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE96005818

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  • Other Information: TH: Thesis (Ph.D.)

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  • Other: DE96005818
  • Report No.: LBL--37955
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 195664
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc667658

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • April 1, 1995

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • April 5, 2016, 12:41 p.m.

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Rodriguez, M.M.S. Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications, thesis or dissertation, April 1, 1995; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc667658/: accessed January 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.