Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 6.1. Corrosion of advanced structural materials

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In order to increase national energy self-sufficiency for the near future, energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and use more efficient energy cycles than those available today. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum steam temperature of 550{degrees}C and thus a conversion efficiency of 35%. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required, compelling subsystems to operate at much higher temperatures and, therefore, in much more corrosive environments than those currently used. Problems of special concern are corrosion and fatigue of direct-fired turbine blades, corrosion and blinding of hot-gas cleanup ... continued below

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21 p.

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Nowok, J.W.; Strobel, T.M.; Bieber, J.A. & Hurley, J.P. April 1, 1995.

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Description

In order to increase national energy self-sufficiency for the near future, energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and use more efficient energy cycles than those available today. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum steam temperature of 550{degrees}C and thus a conversion efficiency of 35%. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required, compelling subsystems to operate at much higher temperatures and, therefore, in much more corrosive environments than those currently used. Problems of special concern are corrosion and fatigue of direct-fired turbine blades, corrosion and blinding of hot-gas cleanup filters, catastrophic failure of high-temperature heat exchangers, and spalling and dissolution of refractory materials. The extreme conditions will require the use of advanced structural materials such as high-temperature ceramics for the construction of the subsystems. Unfortunately, little is known of the performance of these materials in actual coal combustion environments. Although some corrosion testing has been performed in the past, most has been done by groups experimenting with ash or slag stimulants composed of only one or two simple compounds. For this project performed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), actual coal ash and slag will be used in simulated combustion conditions so that more realistic determinations of the mechanisms of corrosion can be made. The work includes three main research areas focusing on two fossil energy subsystems: high-temperature heat exchangers and hot-gas cleanup filters. The first area involves developing existing abilities in thermodynamic equilibrium calculations to determine the most appropriate corroding agents to include in the tests; the second area involves coal slag corrosion of high temperature heat exchangers; and the third, lower-temperature ash and gas corrosion hot-gas cleanup filters.

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21 p.

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OSTI as DE96000616

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  • Other Information: PBD: Apr 1995

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  • Other: DE96000616
  • Report No.: DOE/MC/30097--5084
  • Grant Number: FC21-93MC30097
  • DOI: 10.2172/200699 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 200699
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc667407

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  • April 1, 1995

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Nov. 30, 2015, 8:07 p.m.

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Nowok, J.W.; Strobel, T.M.; Bieber, J.A. & Hurley, J.P. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 6.1. Corrosion of advanced structural materials, report, April 1, 1995; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc667407/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.