Quantitative comparison of the in situ microbial communities in different biomes

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A system to define microbial communities in different biomes requires the application of non-traditional methodology. Classical microbiological methods have severe limitations for the analysis of environmental samples. Pure-culture isolation, biochemical testing, and/or enumeration by direct microscopic counting are not well suited for the estimation of total biomass or the assessment of community composition within environmental samples. Such methods provide little insight into the in situ phenotypic activity of the extant microbiota since these techniques are dependent on microbial growth and thus select against many environmental microorganisms which are non- culturable under a wide range of conditions. It has been repeatedly ... continued below

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18 p.

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White, D.C.; Ringelberg, D.B. & Palmer, R.J. December 31, 1995.

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Description

A system to define microbial communities in different biomes requires the application of non-traditional methodology. Classical microbiological methods have severe limitations for the analysis of environmental samples. Pure-culture isolation, biochemical testing, and/or enumeration by direct microscopic counting are not well suited for the estimation of total biomass or the assessment of community composition within environmental samples. Such methods provide little insight into the in situ phenotypic activity of the extant microbiota since these techniques are dependent on microbial growth and thus select against many environmental microorganisms which are non- culturable under a wide range of conditions. It has been repeatedly documented in the literature that viable counts or direct counts of bacteria attached to sediment grains are difficult to quantitative and may grossly underestimate the extent of the existing community. The traditional tests provide little indication of the in situ nutritional status or for evidence of toxicity within the microbial community. A more recent development (MIDI Microbial Identification System), measure free and ester-linked fatty acids from isolated microorganisms. Bacterial isolates are identified by comparing their fatty acid profiles to the MIKI database which contains over 8000 entries. The application of the MIKI system to the analysis of environmental samples however, has significant drawbacks. The MIDI system was developed to identify clinical microorganisms and requires their isolation and culture on trypticase soy agar at 27{degrees}C. Since many isolates are unable to grow at these restrictive growth conditions, the system does not lend itself to identification of some environmental organisms. A more applicable methodology for environmental microbial analysis is based on the liquid extrication and separation of microbial lipids from environmental samples, followed by quantitative analysis using gas chromatography/

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18 p.

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OSTI as DE96006717

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  • 7. international symposium on microbial ecology, Santos (Brazil), 18-23 Aug 1995

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  • Other: DE96006717
  • Report No.: CONF-9508215--1
  • Grant Number: FG05-90ER60988;AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 207505
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc666748

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  • December 31, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • June 24, 2016, 7:53 p.m.

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White, D.C.; Ringelberg, D.B. & Palmer, R.J. Quantitative comparison of the in situ microbial communities in different biomes, article, December 31, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc666748/: accessed September 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.