The effects of lightning and high altitude electromagnetic pulse on power distribution lines

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We simultaneously recorded the voltages induced by lightning on both ends of an unenergized 448-meter long unenergized electric power line and the lightning vertical electric and horizontal magnetic fields at ground level near the line. The lightning data studied and presented here were due both to cloud lightning and to very close (about 20 m from the line) artificially initiated lightning. For cloud sources, a frequency-domain computer program called EMPLIN was used to calculate induced line voltages as a function of source elevation, angle of incidence, and wave polarization of the radiated cloud discharge pulses in order to compare with ... continued below

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152 p.

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Uman, M.A.; Rubinstein, M. & Yacoub, Z. January 1, 1995.

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Description

We simultaneously recorded the voltages induced by lightning on both ends of an unenergized 448-meter long unenergized electric power line and the lightning vertical electric and horizontal magnetic fields at ground level near the line. The lightning data studied and presented here were due both to cloud lightning and to very close (about 20 m from the line) artificially initiated lightning. For cloud sources, a frequency-domain computer program called EMPLIN was used to calculate induced line voltages as a function of source elevation, angle of incidence, and wave polarization of the radiated cloud discharge pulses in order to compare with the measurements. For very-close lightning, the measured line voltages could be grouped into two categories, those in which multiple, similarly shaped, evenly spaced pulses were observed, which we call oscillatory, and those dominated by a principal pulse with subsidiary oscillations of much smaller amplitude, which we call impulsive. The amplitude of the induced voltage ranged from tens of kilovolts for oscillatory voltages to hundreds of kilovolts for impulsive voltages. A new technique is derived for the calculation of the electromagnetic fields from nearby lightning to ground above an imperfectly conducting ground. This technique was used in conjunction with an existing time domain coupling theory and lightning return stroke model to calculate voltages at either end of the line. The results show fair agreement with the measured oscillatory voltage waveforms if corona is ignored and improved results when corona effects are modeled. The modeling of the impulsive voltage, for which local flashover probably successful. In an attempt to understand better the sources of the line voltages for very close lightning, measurements of the horizontal and vertical electric fields 30 m from triggered lightning were obtained.

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152 p.

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OSTI as DE95008103

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  • Other Information: PBD: Jan 1995

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  • Other: DE95008103
  • Report No.: ORNL/Sub--84-89650/2
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • DOI: 10.2172/26685 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 26685
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc666055

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • January 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • May 2, 2016, 4:20 p.m.

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Uman, M.A.; Rubinstein, M. & Yacoub, Z. The effects of lightning and high altitude electromagnetic pulse on power distribution lines, report, January 1, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc666055/: accessed November 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.