Molecular dynamics simulation of low energy boron and arsenic implant into silicon

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We have studied the implantation of boron and arsenic ions into silicon by classical molecular dynamics simulation. Single ion implant into the dimer reconstructed Si{l_brace}100{r_brace}(2x1) surface has been examined at energies between 0.25 keV and 5.0 keV, at both normal incidence and at non-channeling incidence. By using a new model for electronic stopping, developed for semiconductors and containing only one fitted parameter, we have been able to accurately calculate the depth profile of the implanted B and as atoms. The results of the calculations are compared to the predictions from a binary collision (BC) model for the dopant profile, and ... continued below

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5 p.

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Beardmore, K.; Cai, D. & Gronbech-Jensen, N. July 1, 1996.

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We have studied the implantation of boron and arsenic ions into silicon by classical molecular dynamics simulation. Single ion implant into the dimer reconstructed Si{l_brace}100{r_brace}(2x1) surface has been examined at energies between 0.25 keV and 5.0 keV, at both normal incidence and at non-channeling incidence. By using a new model for electronic stopping, developed for semiconductors and containing only one fitted parameter, we have been able to accurately calculate the depth profile of the implanted B and as atoms. The results of the calculations are compared to the predictions from a binary collision (BC) model for the dopant profile, and to experimental data. This allows us to examine the low energy limits on the validity of the BC approximation, with the aim of producing modifications to the BC model to extend its validity into the sub-keV regime.

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5 p.

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OSTI as DE96012655

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  • 11. international conference on ion implantation technology, Austin, TX (United States), 17-21 Jun 1996

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  • Other: DE96012655
  • Report No.: LA-UR--96-2211
  • Report No.: CONF-9606110--3
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 273734
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc665077

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  • July 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • July 28, 2016, 7:20 p.m.

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Beardmore, K.; Cai, D. & Gronbech-Jensen, N. Molecular dynamics simulation of low energy boron and arsenic implant into silicon, article, July 1, 1996; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc665077/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.