Is there a need for site productivity functions for short-rotation woody crop plantings?

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For over a decade, researchers have used small-scale research plots to assist development and selection of high yielding, pest-resistant clones of fast-growing hardwoods such as hybrid poplar (Populus spp.). Substantial advances have been made in the techniques and criteria for screening species and selecting clones. Data from these research plots indicate that the ultimate performance of selected clones is dependent upon variable factors in the environment. Until now, researchers could only determine the suitability of a given site for such clones, not the actual yield potential of the site. Recently in the north central US, several clones were planted on ... continued below

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Downing, M. & Tuskan, G.A. July 6, 1995.

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For over a decade, researchers have used small-scale research plots to assist development and selection of high yielding, pest-resistant clones of fast-growing hardwoods such as hybrid poplar (Populus spp.). Substantial advances have been made in the techniques and criteria for screening species and selecting clones. Data from these research plots indicate that the ultimate performance of selected clones is dependent upon variable factors in the environment. Until now, researchers could only determine the suitability of a given site for such clones, not the actual yield potential of the site. Recently in the north central US, several clones were planted on larger-than-research-scale plots on private land recontracted under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The historical database could not provide a framework which would allow producers to predict the yield potential of a particular clone on a specific site. Through a systematic combination of clonal trials on experimental research-scale plots and operational plantings on 50 to 100 acre agricultural-scale field plots, it may be possible to develop yield functions or site quality equations which would predict biomass yields at rotation for selected clones. Such estimates will (1) reduce the probability of planting failure, (2) allow maximum expression of the genetic potential of selected superior clones, and thus (3) facilitate accurate economic planning for both the producer and conversion facility manager.

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10 p.

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OSTI as DE96005432

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  • 2. meeting on biomass of the Americas, Portland, OR (United States), 21-24 Aug 1995

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  • Other: DE96005432
  • Report No.: CONF-9508104--7
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 201697
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc664412

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • July 6, 1995

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  • June 29, 2015, 9:42 p.m.

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  • Jan. 22, 2016, 11:45 a.m.

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Downing, M. & Tuskan, G.A. Is there a need for site productivity functions for short-rotation woody crop plantings?, article, July 6, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc664412/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.