The Development of Bands from the Baroque Period to the Present

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The following chapters concern the development of bands of musical wind instruments in Europe and America. These groups may be most conveniently divided into two main classes of bands, military and civilian. Military bands may be defined as those organizations directly under governmental or army rule. This large class of bands includes: brigade bands, regimental bands, post bands and service bands. Brigade bands in early English history comprised two or more regimental bands, each regiment maintaining several bands. These groups were also popular in colonial America. In turn, each regiment of the military (army) had units of companies including troops, ... continued below

Physical Description

viii, 76 leaves : ill., music

Creation Information

Lee, Noah Aquilla, Jr. August 1951.

Context

This thesis is part of the collection entitled: UNT Theses and Dissertations and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 44 times . More information about this thesis can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this thesis or its content.

Chair

Committee Member

Publisher

Rights Holder

For guidance see Citations, Rights, Re-Use.

  • Lee, Noah Aquilla, Jr.

Provided By

UNT Libraries

The UNT Libraries serve the university and community by providing access to physical and online collections, fostering information literacy, supporting academic research, and much, much more.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this thesis. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Degree Information

Description

The following chapters concern the development of bands of musical wind instruments in Europe and America. These groups may be most conveniently divided into two main classes of bands, military and civilian. Military bands may be defined as those organizations directly under governmental or army rule. This large class of bands includes: brigade bands, regimental bands, post bands and service bands. Brigade bands in early English history comprised two or more regimental bands, each regiment maintaining several bands. These groups were also popular in colonial America. In turn, each regiment of the military (army) had units of companies including troops, batteries, or cavalries. The units were authorized to maintain bands in their respective companies; fife and drum bands were also included. Certain bands of these companies were stationed permanently at military headquarters; these are referred to as post bands. In this country an increase in the number of regular army bands (infantry, cavalry, and artillery) has been marked since the latter part of the nineteenth century. These army bands and those of other branches (navy, marine corps, air force, coast guard, etc.) are included under the general name of service bands. The second main class includes a large group of civilian bands. As the name implies, the organizations are composed of civilians and are independent of the military groups. This class includes: circus bands, fraternal bands, industrial bands, organized militia bands, professional bands, school bands, and town or independent bands. The militia bands were bodies of citizens enrolled as military forces for a period of instruction; they were not called into active service except in an emergency. These other civilian, groups perform for civic functions, ceremonies, etc. History shows that the civilian bands have imitated the military bands in instrumentation and repertoire. It is quite apparent that the original army or military band gave rise to the origin of the civilian type of band. Today it is quite common to refer to a civic group as a "military" band, the term actually meaning the size of instrumentation rather than the personnel. Other terms describing instrumentation are "concert" and "symphonic" which may apply to either of the two main classes of bands.

Physical Description

viii, 76 leaves : ill., music

Subjects

Keywords

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this thesis in the Digital Library or other systems.

Collections

This thesis is part of the following collection of related materials.

UNT Theses and Dissertations

Theses and dissertations represent a wealth of scholarly and artistic content created by masters and doctoral students in the degree-seeking process. Some ETDs in this collection are restricted to use by the UNT community.

What responsibilities do I have when using this thesis?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this thesis.

Creation Date

  • August 1951

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 24, 2015, 9:39 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Aug. 10, 2016, 10:25 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this thesis last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 44

Interact With This Thesis

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Lee, Noah Aquilla, Jr. The Development of Bands from the Baroque Period to the Present, thesis, August 1951; Denton, Texas. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc662989/: accessed November 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .