Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1111 to 1157

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This is the fiftieth year since Wilbur and Orville Wright at Kitty Hawk N. C., made their powered flight. That airplane was a fragile and unsteady machine of no immediate utility. It flew for only a minute but it disclosed the solution of the age-old problem of human flight. The Wrights were the first in the history of man to fly. There was no one to teach them. They had to discover principles and to learn the art by cautious and methodical experimenting. From their own research they obtained the practical information needed to design their successful flying machine. The ... continued below

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Creator: Unknown. 1955.

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This report is part of the collection entitled: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection and one other and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 181 times . More information about this report can be viewed below.

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Description

This is the fiftieth year since Wilbur and Orville Wright at Kitty Hawk N. C., made their powered flight. That airplane was a fragile and unsteady machine of no immediate utility. It flew for only a minute but it disclosed the solution of the age-old problem of human flight. The Wrights were the first in the history of man to fly. There was no one to teach them. They had to discover principles and to learn the art by cautious and methodical experimenting. From their own research they obtained the practical information needed to design their successful flying machine. The Wrights received no effective aid from the theoretical studies of flight made by the mathematicians of the nineteenth century. The science of aerodynamics was developed in response to the practical demands of aeronautics in the years to follow. In 1908, the Wrights demonstrated at Fort Myer, Va., a vastly improved flyer, the first military airplane. It carried a passenger and flew for more than an hour. Following this public demonstration, the development of the airplane was taken up vigorously. At first France and Germany took the lead, then Great Britain, but the United States lagged behind in the furthering of this greatest American development of the century. With war clouds in view in 1915, the Congress established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to undertake the scientific study of the problems of fight with a view to their practical solution. President Wilson appointed the members of the first Committee, consisting of the heads of the military and civil agencies of the Government concerned with aeronautics and experts from private life.

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  • URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050019267 External Link
  • Report No.: NACA-AR-39
  • Center for AeroSpace Information Number: 20050019267
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc64124

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection

The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) was a U.S. federal agency founded on March 3, 1915 to undertake, promote, and institutionalize aeronautical research. On October 1, 1958 the agency was dissolved, and its assets and personnel transferred to the newly created National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Technical Report Archive and Image Library

This selection of materials from the Technical Report Archive and Image Library (TRAIL) includes hard-to-find reports published by various government agencies. The technical publications contain reports, images, and technical descriptions of research performed for U.S. government agencies. Topics range from mining, desalination, and radiation to broader physics, biology, and chemistry studies. Some reports include maps, foldouts, blueprints, and other oversize materials.

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  • 1955

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 17, 2011, 5:13 p.m.

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  • Oct. 19, 2017, 12:45 p.m.

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Thirty-Ninth Annual Report of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics: Administrative Report Including Technical Reports Nos. 1111 to 1157, report, 1955; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc64124/: accessed December 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.