The Navier-Stokes Stress Principle for Viscous Fluids

One of 1,437 reports in the series: NACA Technical Memorandums available on this site.

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The Navier-Stokes stress principle is checked in the light of Maxwell's mechanism of friction and in connection herewith the possibility of another theorem is indicated. The Navier-Stokes stress principle is in general predicated upon the conception of the plastic body. Hence the process is a purely phenomenological one, which Newton himself followed with his special theorem for one-dimensional flows. It remained for Maxwell to discover the physical mechanism by which the shear inflow direction is developed: According to it, this shear is only 'fictitious' as it merely represents the substitute for a certain transport on macroscopic motion quantity, as conditioned ... continued below

Creation Information

Mohr, Ernst September 1, 1942.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection and one other and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 12 times . More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Author

Originator

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Titles

Description

The Navier-Stokes stress principle is checked in the light of Maxwell's mechanism of friction and in connection herewith the possibility of another theorem is indicated. The Navier-Stokes stress principle is in general predicated upon the conception of the plastic body. Hence the process is a purely phenomenological one, which Newton himself followed with his special theorem for one-dimensional flows. It remained for Maxwell to discover the physical mechanism by which the shear inflow direction is developed: According to it, this shear is only 'fictitious' as it merely represents the substitute for a certain transport on macroscopic motion quantity, as conditioned by Brown's moiecular motion and the diffusion, respectively. It is clear that this mechanism is not bound to the special case of the one-dimensioilal flows, but holds for any flow as expression of the diffusion, by which a fluid differs sharply from a plastic body. If it is remembered, on the other hand, that the cause of the stresses on the plastic body lies in a certain cohesion of the molecules, it appears by no means self evident that this difference in the mechanism of friction between fluid and plastic body should not prevail in the stress principle as well, although it certainly is desirable in any case, at least subsequently, to establish the general theorem in the sense of Maxwell. Actually, a different theorem is suggested which, in contrast to that by Navier-Stokes, has the form of an unsymmetrical matrix. Without anticipating a final decision several reasons are advanced by way of a special flow which seem to affirm this new theorem. To make it clear that the problem involved here still awaits its final solution, is the real purpose behind the present article.

Source

  • Luftfahrtforschung; Volume 18; No. 9; 327-330

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030064898 External Link
  • Report No.: NACA-TM-1029
  • Center for AeroSpace Information Number: 20030064898
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc63884

Collections

This report is part of the following collections of related materials.

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Collection

The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) was a U.S. federal agency founded on March 3, 1915 to undertake, promote, and institutionalize aeronautical research. On October 1, 1958 the agency was dissolved, and its assets and personnel transferred to the newly created National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

Technical Report Archive and Image Library

This selection of materials from the Technical Report Archive and Image Library (TRAIL) includes hard-to-find reports published by various government agencies. The technical publications contain reports, images, and technical descriptions of research performed for U.S. government agencies. Topics range from mining, desalination, and radiation to broader physics, biology, and chemistry studies. Some reports include maps, foldouts, blueprints, and other oversize materials.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • September 1, 1942

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Nov. 17, 2011, 5:13 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Feb. 6, 2017, 5:52 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 12

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Mohr, Ernst. The Navier-Stokes Stress Principle for Viscous Fluids, report, September 1, 1942; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc63884/: accessed December 12, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.