Careful where you dig!

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Description

Improved excavation techniques help contractors at former nuclear weapons site avoid digging up the past. The Department of Energy's Hanford Site is an excavator's nightmare. It's one of the country's oldest nuclear sites, with facilities that were built in the rush to win a world war and then a decades-long arms race. During World War II the reactors and process facilities at Hanford were constructed with utmost secrecy. For instance, the site was divided up into various, distinct processing areas -- each with its own separate survey coordinate system to confuse an invading enemy. In 1989 when the Cold War ... continued below

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11 p.

Creation Information

Kelly, D.S. April 1, 1996.

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Description

Improved excavation techniques help contractors at former nuclear weapons site avoid digging up the past. The Department of Energy's Hanford Site is an excavator's nightmare. It's one of the country's oldest nuclear sites, with facilities that were built in the rush to win a world war and then a decades-long arms race. During World War II the reactors and process facilities at Hanford were constructed with utmost secrecy. For instance, the site was divided up into various, distinct processing areas -- each with its own separate survey coordinate system to confuse an invading enemy. In 1989 when the Cold War ended, Hanford began its metamorphosis from top secret defense site to the nation's largest and most complex nuclear waste cleanup project. National defense urgency and past environmental and as-built standards of the time left a legacy of chemical discharges and semi-hidden utilities. Also, the new cleanup mission included a new interest in privatization and outsourcing for engineering and services. This brought an influx of new contractors and personnel with no work experience of the Hanford Site. In the 50-year history of Hanford, various government agencies, contractors and their policies have come and gone. As federal budgets rose and fell, so did the accuracy of as-built documentation. At one point, jobs below $150,000 in value were not even documented as they were built because it wasn't considered cost-effective. Many utilities were field-routed, leaving no dependable as-built drawings. To be cost-effective, adjacent construction projects often shared a common excavation, both adding underground lines to the same trench. This 1ed to mixed confidence levels in the accuracy of the as-builts.

Physical Description

11 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00016959

Medium: P; Size: 11 pages

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 01 Apr 1996; Supercedes report DE99050546

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  • Other: DE99050546
  • Report No.: WHC-SA--3073-FP
  • Report No.: ON: DE99050546
  • Report No.: BR: EW0000000
  • Grant Number: AC06-96RL13200
  • DOI: 10.2172/16959 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 16959
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc628504

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • April 1, 1996

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 6, 2017, 7:24 p.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Kelly, D.S. Careful where you dig!, report, April 1, 1996; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc628504/: accessed October 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.