Regional-scale influences on urban air quality : a field study in Phoenix, Arizona.

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Regional air quality can play an important role in determining whether urban ozone or PM-2.5 standards are exceeded. Background levels of nitrogen oxide species (NO{sub x}) and their interactions with natural organics can generate secondary aerosol products via formation of nitric acid and its subsequent reaction with ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. Natural organics and reactive anthropogenic organic compounds, particularly aromatic species and monoterpenes, can also lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosols, contributing to the formation of PM-2.5. Long-range transport and chemical transformation of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} via both photochemical reactions and nighttime chemistry can yield significant ... continued below

Physical Description

9 p.

Creation Information

Gaffney, J. S. October 12, 1998.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Regional air quality can play an important role in determining whether urban ozone or PM-2.5 standards are exceeded. Background levels of nitrogen oxide species (NO{sub x}) and their interactions with natural organics can generate secondary aerosol products via formation of nitric acid and its subsequent reaction with ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. Natural organics and reactive anthropogenic organic compounds, particularly aromatic species and monoterpenes, can also lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosols, contributing to the formation of PM-2.5. Long-range transport and chemical transformation of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} via both photochemical reactions and nighttime chemistry can yield significant regional levels of ozone and other oxidants, such as peroxyacyl nitrates (R-C=O-O-O-NO{sub 2}; PANs). The PANs are key species in determining the apparent age of an air parcel (Gaffney et al., 1989, 1993, 1997). The most common member of the family is peroxyacetyl nitrate (R=CH3-; PAN), which typically accounts for more than 85% of the PANs found in an urban or rural site. The PANs are in equilibrium with NO{sub 2}. Peroxyacyl radicals (R-C=O-O-O) are typically produced by the photooxidation reactions of organics, particularly those of aldehyde oxidation products with OH radical during the daytime (photochemically active) periods. Proposed mechanisms for nighttime formation of PANs (Gaffney et al., 1989) include abstraction reactions of nitrate radical (NO{sub 3}) and the initiation of OH chemistry by olefin-ozone reactions.

Physical Description

9 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00011028

Medium: P; Size: 9 pages

Source

  • Symposium on Interdisciplinary Issues in Atmospheric Chemistry, Dallas, TX (US), 01/10/1999--01/15/1999

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: ANL/ER/CP-96886
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 11028
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc628250

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • October 12, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 11, 2017, 9:04 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Gaffney, J. S. Regional-scale influences on urban air quality : a field study in Phoenix, Arizona., article, October 12, 1998; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc628250/: accessed November 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.