The trend of neutron-scattering studies of hard materials.

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Future high-tech applications will undoubtedly demand materials for carrying out complex tasks under stringent or adverse conditions. One of the important goals in materials design is to be able to introduce specific desirable properties in the components at an early stage during fabrication and to predict the performance of the final product. This approach requires a database of atomic-level structures and response of a variety of key materials and sophisticated algorithms for large-scale computations. Slow (cold to epithermal) neutrons probe the organization and dynamic response of atomic nuclei and electrons in a substance (bulk and low-dimensional) thereby providing a valuable ... continued below

Physical Description

10 p.

Creation Information

Loong, C.-K. April 17, 1998.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Author

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Future high-tech applications will undoubtedly demand materials for carrying out complex tasks under stringent or adverse conditions. One of the important goals in materials design is to be able to introduce specific desirable properties in the components at an early stage during fabrication and to predict the performance of the final product. This approach requires a database of atomic-level structures and response of a variety of key materials and sophisticated algorithms for large-scale computations. Slow (cold to epithermal) neutrons probe the organization and dynamic response of atomic nuclei and electrons in a substance (bulk and low-dimensional) thereby providing a valuable means for a microscopic interpretation of materials properties. For decades neutron technologists and instrument scientists have striven to improve the neutron sources and instrumentation for condensed-matter research. In this International Workshop of the JHT Projects and the N-Arena, I wish to comment on the trend of instrument development, using some recent studies of hard materials as an example. The requirement for high strength at high temperatures has led to intense studies of nitride- and carbide-based ceramics. Additional incentives include the lower density, lower thermal expansion, and better corrosion and oxidation resistance of ceramics as compared to metals. However, the current strength and reliability of nitride and carbide ceramics are not sufficient to replace the metallic counterparts such as heat engine components. The knowledge of atomic short-to-long 1 range ordering, the microstructure of the crystalline grains and intergranular phases as well as the dynamic response of atoms to applied force and temperature fields is an important prerequisite for the realization of wide-spread high-temperature applications of ceramics. The goal of neutron-scattering methodology is to provide the best means for high-resolution characterization of these properties over a wide range of length and time scales (0.1-1000 nm and 10{sup {minus}8}-10{sup {minus}13} sec). Obviously, many different kinds of instruments have to be developed in parallel with the advancement of neutron sources.

Physical Description

10 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00010743

Medium: P; Size: 10 pages

Source

  • International Workshop on JHP Science(JHF '98), Tsukuba (JP), 03/04/1998--03/07/1998

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: ANL/IPNS/CP-96195
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 10743
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc627400

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • April 17, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 6, 2017, 7 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Loong, C.-K. The trend of neutron-scattering studies of hard materials., article, April 17, 1998; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc627400/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.