Technology for managing risk during international inspections

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Inspections under international agreements related to nonproliferation of nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons place sensitive commercial and national-defense information at risk. Facility operators can control risk to sensitive information by denying physical access to inspectors and providing alternative means of inspection. Similarly, exposure of inspectors and facility personnel to radiation or hazardous environments can be reduced, and damage to sensitive processing environments can be avoided if inspection objectives can be achieved without the need for direct physical access by inspectors. A system developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) enables inspectors to achieve inspection objectives in sensitive or hazardous areas by ... continued below

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6 p.

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Lemley, J.R. & Curtiss, J.A. November 1, 1995.

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Description

Inspections under international agreements related to nonproliferation of nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons place sensitive commercial and national-defense information at risk. Facility operators can control risk to sensitive information by denying physical access to inspectors and providing alternative means of inspection. Similarly, exposure of inspectors and facility personnel to radiation or hazardous environments can be reduced, and damage to sensitive processing environments can be avoided if inspection objectives can be achieved without the need for direct physical access by inspectors. A system developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) enables inspectors to achieve inspection objectives in sensitive or hazardous areas by providing virtual presence at an inspection location in place of physical presence. The system has two parts, a mobile unit operated by facility personnel and a stationary base station operated by inspectors. The mobile and stationary units are connected by a fiber-optic communications link. The mobile unit is equipped with two video cameras, a global positioning system (GPS) with dead-reckoning capability, distance measuring equipment (DME), and a theodolite. Five unused channels of RS-232 are available to accommodate data transfer from and control of additional sensor modules. The base station is equipped with monitors for video signals and a notebook computer for analysis and display of sensor data. Inspectors can direct inspection activities through two-way voice communication with the operators of the mobile unit; the real-time response to interactions between inspectors and operators enhances the credibility of the inspection process. Applications involving international inspections for arms control and nonproliferation as well as other applications, such as As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and two-person-rule implementation, are discussed. Planned improvements and extensions of system capabilities are outlined.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96002003

Medium: P; Size: 6 p.

Source

  • 5. international conference on facility-safeguards interface, Jackson Hole, WY (United States), 24-30 Sep 1995

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  • Other: DE96002003
  • Report No.: BNL--61396
  • Report No.: CONF-950923--16
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH00016
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 119998
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc626781

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • November 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 13, 2017, 12:42 p.m.

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Lemley, J.R. & Curtiss, J.A. Technology for managing risk during international inspections, article, November 1, 1995; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc626781/: accessed October 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.