Modeling of dry deposition over regional scales with use of satellite data.

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Dry deposition, an essential component in the atmospheric budget of many trace chemicals, can deliver a major portion of the chemicals deposited at sensitive receptors at the surface of the Earth. Dry deposition in atmospheric numerical models is often described with modules that provide estimates of the deposition velocity V{sub d}, which is the downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height. A fairly common practice in dry deposition modules is to describe surface conditions that affect dry deposition in terms of broad land use and seasonal categories. This practice can lead to unrealistic values for V{sub d}, however, ... continued below

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7 p.

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Xu, Y. October 12, 1998.

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Dry deposition, an essential component in the atmospheric budget of many trace chemicals, can deliver a major portion of the chemicals deposited at sensitive receptors at the surface of the Earth. Dry deposition in atmospheric numerical models is often described with modules that provide estimates of the deposition velocity V{sub d}, which is the downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height. A fairly common practice in dry deposition modules is to describe surface conditions that affect dry deposition in terms of broad land use and seasonal categories. This practice can lead to unrealistic values for V{sub d}, however, when vegetative conditions for one land use category vary considerably within the domain, when abrupt changes in surface conditions are imposed by a change in seasonal category, or when environmental conditions change vegetative properties within one season. To improve this situation, surface spectral reflectance sensed by environmental satellites can be used to provide more realistic depictions of the spatial and temporal variations in surface conditions. Such an approach is explored here, by extending of methods described by Gao (1995) and Gao and Wesely (1995), in conjunction with a previously developed dry deposition module (Wesely, 1989). In addition, because simulations of biogenic emissions usually rely on an adequate description of many of the surface conditions that affect dry deposition, we examine a method of using a single source of satellite data with modules for both biogenic emission rates and dry deposition velocities. The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) version 2.2, which is a version similar to the model described by Geron et al. (1994), is used. Results are presented for ozone V{sub d}, isoprene emission rates, and emission rates of other monoterpenes in the eastern half of the US and nearby areas for selected periods during 1989.

Physical Description

7 p.

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OSTI as DE00011031

Medium: P; Size: 7 pages

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  • Symposium on Interdisciplinary Issues in Atmospheric Chemistry, Dallas, TX (US), 01/10/1999--01/15/1999

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  • Report No.: ANL/ER/CP-96890
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 11031
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc625311

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  • October 12, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • April 11, 2017, 3:35 p.m.

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Xu, Y. Modeling of dry deposition over regional scales with use of satellite data., article, October 12, 1998; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc625311/: accessed October 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.