The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

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The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in ... continued below

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41 p.

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Rubin, E.M. & Plump, A.S. December 1, 1993.

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Description

The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

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41 p.

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OSTI as DE95016416

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  • Other Information: PBD: Dec 1993

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  • Other: DE95016416
  • Report No.: LBL--35789
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/102282 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 102282
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc624741

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • December 1, 1993

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • April 5, 2016, 11:07 a.m.

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Rubin, E.M. & Plump, A.S. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism, report, December 1, 1993; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624741/: accessed November 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.