Equations of state of nonspherical fluids by spherical intermolecular potentials

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The equilibrium properties of anisotropic molecular fluids can be in principle calculated in a statistical mechanics framework, but the theory is generally too cumbersome for many practical applications. Fortunately, at high densities and temperatures the anisotropy can be averaged-out by means of a density and temperature independent potential (the median) that produces reliable thermodynamics [1,2]. The proposal of Shaw and Johnson [1], which turns out to be the so-called median potential [2], is very successful in predicting the thermodynamics of simple fluids such as N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at reasonable high pressures and temperatures [3]. Lebowitz and Percus [2] ... continued below

Physical Description

38 Kilobytes pages

Creation Information

Bastea, S & Ree, F H August 16, 1999.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

The equilibrium properties of anisotropic molecular fluids can be in principle calculated in a statistical mechanics framework, but the theory is generally too cumbersome for many practical applications. Fortunately, at high densities and temperatures the anisotropy can be averaged-out by means of a density and temperature independent potential (the median) that produces reliable thermodynamics [1,2]. The proposal of Shaw and Johnson [1], which turns out to be the so-called median potential [2], is very successful in predicting the thermodynamics of simple fluids such as N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} at reasonable high pressures and temperatures [3]. Lebowitz and Percus [2] pointed out some time ago that the success of this approximation could perhaps be understood in terms of a simple theory that treats the asphericity as a perturbation. The median appears to be the best choice for hard nonspherical potential [4], which may explain its success for fluids at high densities, where the hard core contribution is known to be dominant.

Physical Description

38 Kilobytes pages

Source

  • The 40th Annual High Pressure Conference of Japan, Fukuoka City (JP), 11/10/1999--11/12/1999

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-135454
  • Report No.: DP0101031
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 14913
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc624327

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • August 16, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 6, 2016, 3:18 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Bastea, S & Ree, F H. Equations of state of nonspherical fluids by spherical intermolecular potentials, article, August 16, 1999; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624327/: accessed September 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.