Development of a model to simulate the performance of hydronic radiant cooling ceilings

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A significant amount of the electrical energy used to cool non-residential buildings equipped with all-air systems is drawn by the fans that transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydronic radiant cooling systems have the potential to reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating the tasks of ventilation and thermal conditioning. Because of the physical properties of water, hydronic radiant cooling systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5170 of the otherwise necessary fan energy. This improvement alone significantly reduces the energy consumption and peak power requirement of the ... continued below

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31 p.

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Stetiu, C. & Feustel, H.E. June 1, 1995.

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Description

A significant amount of the electrical energy used to cool non-residential buildings equipped with all-air systems is drawn by the fans that transport the cool air through the thermal distribution system. Hydronic radiant cooling systems have the potential to reduce the amount of air transported through the building by separating the tasks of ventilation and thermal conditioning. Because of the physical properties of water, hydronic radiant cooling systems can transport a given amount of thermal energy using less than 5170 of the otherwise necessary fan energy. This improvement alone significantly reduces the energy consumption and peak power requirement of the air conditioning system. Hydronic radiant cooling systems have been used for more than 30 years in hospital rooms to provide a draft-free, thermally stable environment. The energy savings and peak-load characteristics of these systems have not yet been analyzed systematically. Moreover, adequate guidelines for design and control of these systems do not exist. This has prevented their widespread application to other building types. The evaluation of the theoretical performance of hydronic systems could be made most conveniently by computer models. Energy analysis programs such as DOE-2 do not have the capability to simulate hydronic radiant systems yet. In this paper the development of a model that can simulate accurately the dynamic performance of hydronic radiant cooling systems is described. The model is able to calculate loads, heat extraction rates, room air temperature and room surface temperature distributions, and can be used to evaluate issues such as thermal comfort, controls, system sizing, system configuration and dynamic response. The model was created with the Simulation Problem Analysis and Research Kernel (SPARK) developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, which provides a methodology for describing and solving the dynamic, non-linear equations that correspond to complex physical systems.

Physical Description

31 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95014789

Source

  • Annual meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), San Diego, CA (United States), 24-28 Jun 1995

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  • Other: DE95014789
  • Report No.: LBL--36636
  • Report No.: CONF-950624--3
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/102267 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 105892
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc624249

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • June 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • June 23, 2016, 3:02 p.m.

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Stetiu, C. & Feustel, H.E. Development of a model to simulate the performance of hydronic radiant cooling ceilings, article, June 1, 1995; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624249/: accessed April 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.