Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation

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We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per ... continued below

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11 p.

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Blakely, E.A. & Castro, J.R. November 1, 1994.

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  • Blakely, E.A. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
  • Castro, J.R. California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

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Description

We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per fraction per field for the maximum skin reactions of helium, carbon and neon ions compared to electrons. Comparisons with skin reactions from low-energy neutrons indicate that Bragg peak carbon ions (initial energy 308 MeV/nucleon) are slightly less effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak neon ions (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) corrected for differences in reference radiation are slightly more effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak silicon (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) result in an enhanced acute skin reaction, and a premature appearance of late effects that may indicate a significantly different mechanism of damage and/or repair.

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11 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE95014786

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  • NIRS international seminar on the application of heavy ion accelerator to radiotherapy, Chiba (Japan), 14-16 Nov 1994

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  • Other: DE95014786
  • Report No.: LBL--36823
  • Report No.: CONF-9411202--2
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 101261
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc624237

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • November 1, 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Oct. 4, 2017, 2:07 p.m.

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Blakely, E.A. & Castro, J.R. Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation, article, November 1, 1994; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624237/: accessed October 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.