The efficacy of oxidative coupling for promoting in-situ immobilization of hydroxylated aromatics in contaminated soil and sediment systems. 1998 annual progress report

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'Hydroxylated aromatic compounds (HAC''s) and their precursors are common contaminants of surface and subsurface systems at DOE facilities. The environmental fate and transport of such compounds, particularly in subsurface systems, is generally dominated by their sorption and desorption by soils and sediments. Certain secondary chemical reactions, most specifically abiotic and/or enzymatic oxidative coupling, may be significant in controlling the sorption and subsequent desorption of such hydroxylated aromatics by soils and sediments. The principal objectives of this study are to investigate: (1) the role of abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions on the immobilization of HAC''s; (2) the effects of environmental factors on such ... continued below

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5 pages

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Weber, W.J. & Bhandari, A. June 1, 1998.

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'Hydroxylated aromatic compounds (HAC''s) and their precursors are common contaminants of surface and subsurface systems at DOE facilities. The environmental fate and transport of such compounds, particularly in subsurface systems, is generally dominated by their sorption and desorption by soils and sediments. Certain secondary chemical reactions, most specifically abiotic and/or enzymatic oxidative coupling, may be significant in controlling the sorption and subsequent desorption of such hydroxylated aromatics by soils and sediments. The principal objectives of this study are to investigate: (1) the role of abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions on the immobilization of HAC''s; (2) the effects of environmental factors on such immobilization; and (3) preliminary engineering approaches utilizing enhanced abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions to immobilize hydroxylated aromatics in-situ. Information gathered from the study will be useful in quantifying the behavior of this class of organic compounds in various subsurface contamination scenarios relevant to DOE facilities, and in specifying strategies for the selection and design of remediation technologies. Over the first two years of this three-year project, the authors have developed a significantly improved understanding of the mechanisms of hydroxylated aromatic compound sorption and immobilization by natural soils and sediments. Immobilization in this context is attributed to oxidative coupling of the hydroxylated aromatics subsequent to their sorption to a soil or sediment, and is quantified in terms of the amount of a sorbed target compound retained by a sorbent after a series of sequential water and solvent extractions. The presence of oxygen, metal oxides, and organic matter, all of which can potentially catalyze/facilitate the abiotic oxidative coupling of HAC''s, were investigated during these first two years. Three different HAC''s: phenol, trichlorophenol and o-cresol were included in the experimental program. Inorganic soil matrices were represented by a glacial wash sand (Wurtsmith sand) having very low organic content. Because the chemical nature of soil organic matter may potentially affect the extent of coupling or immobilization, sorbents having different organic matter compositions are being investigated. Two of the three studied to date are near-surface soils, characterized by geologically younger organic material (Fox Forest soil and Fox Grassland soil). The third sorbent is an older and diagenetically altered soil (Lachine Shale). Sorbent preparation, characterization and experimental protocol development were completed in the first year of the study while the second year of the project has focused primarily on experiments with natural systems, as planned. Preliminary work with engineered systems has been initiated earlier than scheduled in order to integrate and relate all aspects of the study.'

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5 pages

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  • Other: DE00013519
  • Report No.: EMSP-54548--98
  • Grant Number: NONE
  • DOI: 10.2172/13519 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 13519
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc624085

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  • June 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • June 13, 2016, 6:03 p.m.

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Weber, W.J. & Bhandari, A. The efficacy of oxidative coupling for promoting in-situ immobilization of hydroxylated aromatics in contaminated soil and sediment systems. 1998 annual progress report, report, June 1, 1998; United States. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc624085/: accessed May 20, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.