Direct ground water flow direction and velocity measurements using the colloidal borescope

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

The colloidal borescope is an in situ instrument capable of directly observing suspended colloidal size particles (1 to 10 {mu}m) and determining ground water flow direction and velocity in an open borehole or monitor well in real time. In addition, the borescope can be used to investigate colloid mobilization during well sampling and the influence of pumping, tides, and subsurface drains. The fixed-focus colloidal borescope was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Grand Junction (ORNL-GJ) in Colorado, and has been used to characterize ground water flow at several DOE facilities including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Kansas City, Fernald, Savannah ... continued below

Physical Description

9 p.

Creation Information

Ferry, R.A.; Rueth, L.R. & Landgraf, R.K. July 1, 1995.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 44 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Authors

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

The colloidal borescope is an in situ instrument capable of directly observing suspended colloidal size particles (1 to 10 {mu}m) and determining ground water flow direction and velocity in an open borehole or monitor well in real time. In addition, the borescope can be used to investigate colloid mobilization during well sampling and the influence of pumping, tides, and subsurface drains. The fixed-focus colloidal borescope was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Grand Junction (ORNL-GJ) in Colorado, and has been used to characterize ground water flow at several DOE facilities including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Kansas City, Fernald, Savannah River, Hanford, Portsmouth, and Paducah. The borescope consists of a video camera, compass, optical 14OX magnification lens, and illumination source, all encased in a stainless steel, waterproof housing. The colloidal borescope is lowered to the desired depth in the well and video images of colloids are tracked by a Video Image Analysis System (VIAS) which uses a PC computer with a video frame-grabber board to digitize up to 256 colloids every 4 seconds. The VIAS analyses the digitized video images and calculates the number, size, flow direction, and flow rate of the colloids. These data are recorded on the PC hard drive and plotted. Two borescopes have been used at the LLNL facilities: the original fixed-focus borescope instrument with software designed by the ORNL-GJ, and the remote-focus, variable-illumination borescope with particle image processing LabView software designed by LLNL. Both instruments function similarly, however, the remote-focus borescope provides a 500-mm focal range, variable illumination for better particle tracking, a flux-gate compass, an alpha-numeric image encoder, and LabView processing software that provides several real-time image processing options and digital sampling frequencies. A typical borescope log is shown.

Physical Description

9 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95017287

Source

  • ER `95: environmental remediation conference: committed to results, Denver, CO (United States), 13-18 Aug 1995

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE95017287
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--118910
  • Report No.: CONF-950868--13
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 102377
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc623945

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • July 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Feb. 23, 2016, 1:27 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 3
Total Uses: 44

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Ferry, R.A.; Rueth, L.R. & Landgraf, R.K. Direct ground water flow direction and velocity measurements using the colloidal borescope, article, July 1, 1995; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623945/: accessed June 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.