Investigation of the potential impacts from tritium soil contamination in the CP-5 yard.

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Based on a review of available data, significant contributions to low-level tritium soil contamination in the CP-5 yard have been made by airborne tritium fallout and rainout from the CP-5 ventilation system stack. Based on the distribution of tritium in the yard, it is also likely that leaks in secondary system piping which lead to the cooling towers were a significant contributor to tritium in CP-5 yard subsurface soil. Based on the foregoing analysis, low-level tritium contamination will not prohibit the release of the yard for unrestricted use in the future. Worst case dose estimates based on very conservative assumptions ... continued below

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Medium: P; Size: 127 pages

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Hysong, R. J. December 21, 1998.

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Description

Based on a review of available data, significant contributions to low-level tritium soil contamination in the CP-5 yard have been made by airborne tritium fallout and rainout from the CP-5 ventilation system stack. Based on the distribution of tritium in the yard, it is also likely that leaks in secondary system piping which lead to the cooling towers were a significant contributor to tritium in CP-5 yard subsurface soil. Based on the foregoing analysis, low-level tritium contamination will not prohibit the release of the yard for unrestricted use in the future. Worst case dose estimates based on very conservative assumptions indicate that a 25 rmem annual effective dose equivalent limit will not be exceeded under the most restrictive residential-use family farm scenario. Given the impermeable nature of the glacial till under CP-5, low-level concentrations of tritium may be occasionally detected in the deep well (3300 12D), but the peak concentration will not approach the levels calculated by RESRAD; however, continued monitoring of the deep well is recommended. To ensure that all sources of potential tritium release have been removed from the CP-5 complex, removal of tritiated water from each rod-out hole and an evaluation of the physical integrity of the rod-out holes is recommended. This will also allow for an evaluation of tritium concentrations in shallow groundwater under CP-5 by sampling groundwater that is currently being forced into the drain tile system. Additional surface and subsurface soil sampling and analysis will be required to determine the final release status of soils around the Building 330 complex relative to elevated concentrations of CS-137, CO-60,Co-57, and Eu-152 identified during the 1993 IT Corporation characterization. The potential radiological impact from isolated elevations of the latter radionuclides is relatively low and can be evaluated as part of the final status survey of outdoor areas surrounding the Building 330 complex. In summary, the following activities are recommended: Remove tritiated water from each rod-out hole; Monitor rod-out hole tritium concentrations as they fill up with shallow groundwater; Continue groundwater monitoring and Perform surface and subsurface soil sampling around the CP-5 complex as part of the final status survey.

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Medium: P; Size: 127 pages

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OSTI as DE00012330

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  • Other Information: PBD: 21 Dec 1998

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  • Report No.: ANL/D& D/98-2
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • DOI: 10.2172/12330 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 12330
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc623624

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Creation Date

  • December 21, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • March 22, 2016, 1:54 p.m.

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Hysong, R. J. Investigation of the potential impacts from tritium soil contamination in the CP-5 yard., report, December 21, 1998; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623624/: accessed June 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.