A fundamental study of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fiber optics for remote measurements of trace metals. 1998 annual progress report

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

'Improved technologies are required by DOE for characterization and monitoring for site clean-up and waste processing applications. Especially needed are field deployable methods and devices of real-time monitoring to reduce dependency on laboratory analyses which are costly and time consuming. Improved sensors are needed for on-site analyses to provide real-time analytical capabilities for screening level and/or decision-quality data. Matrices of interest to the DOE are soils (or other solids), slurries, and aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a useful method for determining the elemental composition of solids. This method has been recently reviewed and a number of ... continued below

Physical Description

15 pages

Creation Information

Goode, S. & Angel, S.M. June 1, 1998.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Sponsor

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

'Improved technologies are required by DOE for characterization and monitoring for site clean-up and waste processing applications. Especially needed are field deployable methods and devices of real-time monitoring to reduce dependency on laboratory analyses which are costly and time consuming. Improved sensors are needed for on-site analyses to provide real-time analytical capabilities for screening level and/or decision-quality data. Matrices of interest to the DOE are soils (or other solids), slurries, and aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a useful method for determining the elemental composition of solids. This method has been recently reviewed and a number of different applications have been described. In the LIBS technique, a high-power pulsed laser is used to generate a plasma from the sample of interest. This phenomenon was first demonstrated in 1963 using a pulsed ruby laser. The elemental composition of the sample is accomplished by measuring the atomic emission from the atoms and ions in the plasma. There are many reports of the use of LIBS for measuring metals in solid substrates. There have also been LIBS investigations of aerosols, single particles, metals in solution including uranium, and even chlorinated species in solution. More recently, LIBS has been used for measuring Ba and Cr in soil using a fiber-optic cable. LIBS shows great potential for measuring metal contaminants in soils and on particles (e.g., stack emissions) based on their atomic emission in a laser-induced plasma. Another important application for this technique is the remote analysis of highly radioactive materials, such as the glasses produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The use of fiber optics for both collection of the atomic emission and delivery of the laser to the sampling area could eliminate the need for sampling. In this work the authors study the time-evolution of the LIBS emission for different matrices to better understand how to optimize the signal. Also, they investigate the use of fiber optics for laser delivery and signal collection, and the influence of the geometry of the fiber optic launch and collection probes to determine the effect on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, they study the LIBS signal for different sample matrices as a function of excitation wavelength across a broad spectrum. A result of this study should be a determination of the optimal excitation and collection conditions and sampling times for metal contaminants in different matrices, and an understanding of the strengths and limitations of using fiber optics for LIBS sampling.'

Physical Description

15 pages

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE00013445
  • Report No.: EMSP-55205--98
  • Grant Number: NONE
  • DOI: 10.2172/13445 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 13445
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc623376

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • June 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • June 13, 2016, 4:28 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 7

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Goode, S. & Angel, S.M. A fundamental study of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using fiber optics for remote measurements of trace metals. 1998 annual progress report, report, June 1, 1998; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623376/: accessed September 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.