Identifying Energy Savings Opportunities in Industrial Pumping Systems

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

In most industrial settings, energy consumed by pumping systems is responsible for a major part of the overall electricity bill. In some cases, the energy is used quite efficiently; in others, it is not. Facility operators may be very familiar with pumping system equipment controllability, reliability, and availability, but only marginally aware of system efficiency. There are some good reasons to increase that awareness: As budgets shrink and the intensity of both domestic and international competition increases, the pressure to find additional methods to reduce operating costs will grow. The reliability of pumps correlates with their efficiency; that is, pumps ... continued below

Physical Description

11 pages

Creation Information

Casada, D.A. & McElhaney, K.L. August 23, 1999.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Sponsor

Publishers

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

In most industrial settings, energy consumed by pumping systems is responsible for a major part of the overall electricity bill. In some cases, the energy is used quite efficiently; in others, it is not. Facility operators may be very familiar with pumping system equipment controllability, reliability, and availability, but only marginally aware of system efficiency. There are some good reasons to increase that awareness: As budgets shrink and the intensity of both domestic and international competition increases, the pressure to find additional methods to reduce operating costs will grow. The reliability of pumps correlates with their efficiency; that is, pumps operated near their design, or best efficiency point, will tend to perform more reliably and with greater availability. More frugal and efficient use of the earth's limited natural resources is essential. The cost of energy consumed by pumps usually dominates the pump life cycle cost. Many end users, already strained to support day-to-day facility operations, lack the time and resources to perform a methodical engineering study of the many pumps within their facilities to understand their associated energy costs and the potential opportunities for energy savings. Under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy's (USDOE) Motor Challenge Program, screening guidance documents and computer software have been developed to help end users, consultants, and equipment distributors recognize, both qualitatively and quantitatively, pumping system efficiency improvement opportunities. A key element in the Motor Challenge optimization strategy is to encourage a systems approach to how motors, drives, and motor-driven equipment are engineered, specified, operated, and maintained by industry. Because pumps have been identified as the single largest end use application, accounting for 25% of motor systems energy use in all manufacturing industries in the United States, they are a natural target in any effort to improve motor-driven systems' energy consumption. The general thesis of this approach is that it is more important to gain a measure of the overall system efficiency or effectiveness than to focus on individual components. The elements that comprise the systems approach and their general order of review (in reverse sequence) are: ultimate system goal or purpose piping system, pump, gear or coupling, motor, adjustable speed drive (if applicable), motor starter, transformer. This paper describes the general methodologies employed and shows a case study example of the screening and software application.

Physical Description

11 pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00011222

Source

  • Argentina EdeE School of Energy Studies, Buenos Aires (AR), 08/23/1999--08/27/1999

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: ORNL/CP-104094
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 11222
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc623085

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • August 23, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Aug. 3, 2016, 1:51 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 8

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Casada, D.A. & McElhaney, K.L. Identifying Energy Savings Opportunities in Industrial Pumping Systems, article, August 23, 1999; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623085/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.