The Development and Application of Reactive Transport Modeling Techniques to Study Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain, NV

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Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been chosen as a possible site for the first high level radioactive waste repository in the United States. As part of the site investigation studies, we need to make scientifically rigorous estimations of radionuclide migration in the event of a repository breach. Performance assessment models used to make these estimations are computationally intensive. We have developed two reactive transport modeling techniques to simulate radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain: (1) the selective coupling approach applied to the convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model and (2) a reactive stream tube approach (RST). These models were designed to capture the important processes ... continued below

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160 pages

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Viswanathan, Hari Selvi September 1, 1999.

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  • Los Alamos National Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Los Alamos, New Mexico

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Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been chosen as a possible site for the first high level radioactive waste repository in the United States. As part of the site investigation studies, we need to make scientifically rigorous estimations of radionuclide migration in the event of a repository breach. Performance assessment models used to make these estimations are computationally intensive. We have developed two reactive transport modeling techniques to simulate radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain: (1) the selective coupling approach applied to the convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model and (2) a reactive stream tube approach (RST). These models were designed to capture the important processes that influence radionuclide migration while being computationally efficient. The conventional method of modeling reactive transport models is to solve a coupled set of multi-dimensional partial differential equations for the relevant chemical components in the system. We have developed an iterative solution technique, denoted the selective coupling method, that represents a versatile alternative to traditional uncoupled iterative techniques and the filly coupled global implicit method. We show that selective coupling results in computational and memory savings relative to these approaches. We develop RST as an alternative to the CDR method for solving large two- or three-dimensional reactive transport simulations for cases in which one is interested in predicting the flux across a specific control plane. In the RST method, the multidimensional problem is reduced to a series of one-dimensional transport simulations along streamlines. The key assumption with RST is that mixing at the control plane approximates the transverse dispersion between streamlines. We compare the CDR and RST approaches for several scenarios that are relevant to the Yucca Mountain Project. For example, we apply the CDR and RST approaches to model an ongoing field experiment called the Unsaturated Zone Transport Test.

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160 pages

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE00015131

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  • Other Information: TH: Thesis; Thesis information not supplied

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  • Report No.: LA-13642-T
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • DOI: 10.2172/15131 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 15131
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc623011

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • September 1, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Aug. 8, 2016, 7:26 p.m.

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Viswanathan, Hari Selvi. The Development and Application of Reactive Transport Modeling Techniques to Study Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain, NV, thesis or dissertation, September 1, 1999; Los Alamos, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc623011/: accessed October 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.