Chemistry, mineralogy, and artifical weathering of PFBC by-products

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Chemical and mineralogical analyses were performed on spent bed residues and cyclone ashes acquired from the TIDD pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) demonstration plant operated by American Electric Power in Brilliant, OH. The cyclone ashes were composed of fly ash, dolomite, anhydrite, periclase, and calcite in decreasing order of abundance. By comparison, bed residues contained less dolomite and fly ash but more anhydrite, calcite and periclase. All samples were highly alkaline with paste pH values ranging from 9.9 to 12.3. The major element chemistry of the by-products was dominated by Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Al and Si. All materials met ... continued below

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8 p.

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Fowler, R.K.; Soto, U.I. & Bigham, J.M. November 1, 1995.

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Chemical and mineralogical analyses were performed on spent bed residues and cyclone ashes acquired from the TIDD pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) demonstration plant operated by American Electric Power in Brilliant, OH. The cyclone ashes were composed of fly ash, dolomite, anhydrite, periclase, and calcite in decreasing order of abundance. By comparison, bed residues contained less dolomite and fly ash but more anhydrite, calcite and periclase. All samples were highly alkaline with paste pH values ranging from 9.9 to 12.3. The major element chemistry of the by-products was dominated by Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Al and Si. All materials met the criteria for ceiling concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni, Se and Zn as defined for land application of sewage sludges. Arsenic exceeded the ceiling level in one of six samples. An artificial weathering study was conducted to evaluate the impact of PFBC by-products on water quality in mined land reclamation. The study was performed using two mine spoils (pH 3.8 and 5.6) mixed with cyclone ash at rates of 0, 10, 20 and 40 wt % by-product. The composition of leachates from the mixtures was mostly a function of rate of by-product application and equilibration time. In general, the addition of PFBC by-product increased pH, conductivity, and the concentrations of dissolved Ca, K, Mg, Mo, Na, S, and Sr whereas the concentrations of Al, Fe, and Mn decreased. Six metals (Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, and Pb) regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act were below concentration levels defined for drinking water standards. No significant alteration of native spoil minerals was observed over the course of the study; however, hydration/precipitation reactions resulted in the rapid formation of gypsum. No evidence of ettringite crystallization was available after 132 days of periodic leaching.

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8 p.

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OSTI as DE96002114

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  • 12. annual international Pittsburgh coal conference, Pittsburgh, PA (United States), 11-15 Sep 1995

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  • Other: DE96002114
  • Report No.: DOE/MC/28060--96/C0558
  • Report No.: CONF-950952--1
  • Grant Number: FC21-91MC28060
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 125399
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc622931

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  • November 1, 1995

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  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Nov. 19, 2015, 1 p.m.

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Fowler, R.K.; Soto, U.I. & Bigham, J.M. Chemistry, mineralogy, and artifical weathering of PFBC by-products, article, November 1, 1995; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622931/: accessed September 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.