Numerical simulation of precipitation over the Southwestern United States during the 1994-1995 winter season

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Accurate assessments of precipitation and surface snow budget during winter seasons are crucial for managing water resources in the western United States. This region receives most of its annual precipitation during winter months and relies on water stored in snowpack and reservoirs for water supply during dry summer seasons. Rainfall directly affects water inflow into reservoirs while snowmelt determines it during spring and summer. Precipitation and snow budget result from interactions among large-scale forcing, mesoscale processes, and surface energy balance. Interaction among these elements is highly nonlinear and includes various processes such as large-scale water vapor and temperature advection, precipitation ... continued below

Physical Description

6 p.

Creation Information

Kim, J. September 28, 1995.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Author

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Accurate assessments of precipitation and surface snow budget during winter seasons are crucial for managing water resources in the western United States. This region receives most of its annual precipitation during winter months and relies on water stored in snowpack and reservoirs for water supply during dry summer seasons. Rainfall directly affects water inflow into reservoirs while snowmelt determines it during spring and summer. Precipitation and snow budget result from interactions among large-scale forcing, mesoscale processes, and surface energy balance. Interaction among these elements is highly nonlinear and includes various processes such as large-scale water vapor and temperature advection, precipitation physics, orographic forcing, turbulence, solar and terrestrial radiative transfer, and snow-albedo feedback. Hence, one need to take these processes into consideration in order to obtain accurate assessments of regional water resources over time scales longer than a season. A regional model that interactively couples atmospheric and land surface processes is a cost-effective tool for an assessment of precipitation and surface hydrology over large areas at a relatively fine resolution. Such models can include complex physical and dynamical processes involved in the interaction between the atmosphere and land surfaces. Another advantage of coupled atmosphere-land surface modeling is that simulations, when verified against local observations, can provide area-integrated values. Area-integrated values are useful for computing overall budgets, but they are somewhat difficult to obtain directly from local observations. Hence, a coupled atmosphere-surface model is especially useful for computing area-weighted values for areas of interest.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE96002687

Source

  • 9. joint American Meteorological Society/Air and Waste Management Association conference on applications of air pollution meteorology, Atlanta, GA (United States), 28 Jan - 2 Feb 1996

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE96002687
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--121884
  • Report No.: CONF-960127--7
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 137295
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc622629

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • September 28, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Feb. 19, 2016, 8:29 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Kim, J. Numerical simulation of precipitation over the Southwestern United States during the 1994-1995 winter season, article, September 28, 1995; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622629/: accessed June 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.