The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires.

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Land managers are increasingly implementing strategies that employ the use of fire in prescribed burns to sustain ecosystems and plan to sustain the rate of increase in its use over the next five years. In planning and executing expanded use of fire in wildland treatment it is important to estimate the human health and safety consequences, property damage, and the extent of visibility degradation from the resulting conflagration-pyrolysis gases, soot and smoke generated during flaming, smoldering and/or glowing fires. Traditional approaches have often employed the analysis of weather observations and forecasts to determine whether a prescribed burn will affect populations, ... continued below

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12 pages

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Brown, D. F.; Dunn, W. E.; Lazaro, M. A. & Policastro, A. J. August 17, 1999.

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Description

Land managers are increasingly implementing strategies that employ the use of fire in prescribed burns to sustain ecosystems and plan to sustain the rate of increase in its use over the next five years. In planning and executing expanded use of fire in wildland treatment it is important to estimate the human health and safety consequences, property damage, and the extent of visibility degradation from the resulting conflagration-pyrolysis gases, soot and smoke generated during flaming, smoldering and/or glowing fires. Traditional approaches have often employed the analysis of weather observations and forecasts to determine whether a prescribed burn will affect populations, property, or protected Class I areas. However, the complexity of the problem lends itself to advanced PC-based models that are simple to use for both calculating the emissions from the burning of wildland fuels and the downwind dispersion of smoke and other products of pyrolysis, distillation, and/or fuels combustion. These models will need to address the effects of residual smoldering combustion, including plume dynamics and optical effects. In this paper, we discuss a suite of tools that can be applied for analyzing dispersion. These tools include the dispersion models FIREPLUME and SMOKE, together with the meteorological preprocessor SEBMET.

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12 pages

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OSTI as DE00011939

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  • Joint Fire Science Program Conference and Workshop, Boise, ID (US), 06/17/1999--06/19/1999

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  • Report No.: ANL/EA/CP-99817
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 11939
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc622541

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • August 17, 1999

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  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • March 28, 2016, 9:10 p.m.

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Brown, D. F.; Dunn, W. E.; Lazaro, M. A. & Policastro, A. J. The smoke-fireplume model : tool for eventual application to prescribed burns and wildland fires., article, August 17, 1999; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622541/: accessed December 11, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.