Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials

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Description

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and ... continued below

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10 p.

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Pierce, R.A. & Smith, J.R. November 1, 1995.

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Description

A wet chemical oxidation technology has been developed to address issues facing defense-related facilities, private industry, and small-volume generators such as university and medical laboratories. Initially tested to destroy and decontaminate a heterogenous mixture of radioactive-contaminated solid waste, the technology can also remediate other hazardous waste forms. The process, unique to Savannah River, offers a valuable alternative to incineration and other high-temperature or high-pressure oxidation processes. The process uses nitric acid in phosphoric acid; phosphoric acid allows nitric acid to be retained in solution well above its normal boiling point. The reaction converts organics to carbon dioxide and water, and generates NO{sub x} vapors which can be recycled using air and water. Oxidation is complete in one to three hours. In previous studies, many organic compounds were completely oxidized, within experimental error, at atmospheric pressure below 180{degrees}C; more stable compounds were decomposed at 200{degrees}C and 170 kPa. Recent studies have evaluated processing parameters and potential throughputs for three primary compounds: EDTA, polyethylene, and cellulose. The study of polyvinylchloride oxidation is incomplete at this time.

Physical Description

10 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE96001859

Source

  • 3. American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) biennial mixed waste symposium, Baltimore, MD (United States), 7-11 Aug 1995

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  • Other: DE96001859
  • Report No.: WSRC-MS--95-0080
  • Report No.: CONF-950877--21
  • Grant Number: AC09-89SR18035
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 123602
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc622416

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  • November 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Feb. 9, 2016, 6 p.m.

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Pierce, R.A. & Smith, J.R. Nitric-phosphoric acid oxidation of organic waste materials, article, November 1, 1995; Aiken, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622416/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.