Implementing and testing ATM in a production LAN

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology is currently receiving extensive attention in the computer networking arena. Many experts predict that ATM will be the future networking technology for both the Local Area Network (LAN) and the Wide Area Network (WAN). This paper presents the results of a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories` Advanced Networking Department and Engineering Sciences Center to study the implementation of ATM in one of Sandia`s most heavily loaded production networks. The network consists of over 120 Sun Sparc 10s and 20s, two SparcCenter 2000s, a 12 node parallel IBM SP-2, and several other miscellaneous high-end workstations. The ... continued below

Physical Description

22 p.

Creation Information

Naegle, J.; Testi, N.; Tolendino, L. & Zepper, J. June 1, 1995.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology is currently receiving extensive attention in the computer networking arena. Many experts predict that ATM will be the future networking technology for both the Local Area Network (LAN) and the Wide Area Network (WAN). This paper presents the results of a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories` Advanced Networking Department and Engineering Sciences Center to study the implementation of ATM in one of Sandia`s most heavily loaded production networks. The network consists of over 120 Sun Sparc 10s and 20s, two SparcCenter 2000s, a 12 node parallel IBM SP-2, and several other miscellaneous high-end workstations. The existing network was first characterized through extensive traffic measurements to better understand the capabilities and limitations of the existing network technologies and to provide a baseline for comparison to an ATM network. This characterization was used to select a subset of the network elements which would benefit most from conversion to the ATM technology. This subset was then converted to equipment based on the latest ATM standards. With direct OC-3c (155 Mbps) host connections for the workstations and the file and compute servers, we demonstrated as much as 122 Mbps throughput (memory-to-memory TCP/IP transfers) between endpoints. Flow control in the classical many-to-one client server environment was also investigated. Throughout all of our tests, the interaction of the user applications with the network technologies was documented and possible improvements were tested. The performance and reliability of the ATM network was compared to the original network to determine the benefits and liabilities of the ATM technology.

Physical Description

22 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95013019

Source

  • Hawaii international conference on system sciences, WaiLea, HI (United States), 3-6 Jan 1996

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Other: DE95013019
  • Report No.: SAND--95-1103C
  • Report No.: CONF-960116--1
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 125189
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc622272

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • June 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 14, 2016, 4:05 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 2

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Naegle, J.; Testi, N.; Tolendino, L. & Zepper, J. Implementing and testing ATM in a production LAN, article, June 1, 1995; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc622272/: accessed December 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.