Low-mass, intrinsically-hard high-temperature radiator. Final report, Phase I

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Thermacore, Inc. of Lancaster, Pennsylvania has completed a Phase I SBIR program to investigate the use of layered ceramic/metal composites in the design of low-mass hardened radiators for space heat rejection systems. The program is being monitored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). This effort evaluated the use of layered composites as a material to form thin-walled, vacuum leaktight heat pipes. The heat pipes would be incorporated into a large heat pipe radiator for waste heat rejection from a space nuclear power source. This approach forms an attractive alternative to metal or ... continued below

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180 p.

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Creator: Unknown. June 15, 1990.

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Description

Thermacore, Inc. of Lancaster, Pennsylvania has completed a Phase I SBIR program to investigate the use of layered ceramic/metal composites in the design of low-mass hardened radiators for space heat rejection systems. The program is being monitored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). This effort evaluated the use of layered composites as a material to form thin-walled, vacuum leaktight heat pipes. The heat pipes would be incorporated into a large heat pipe radiator for waste heat rejection from a space nuclear power source. This approach forms an attractive alternative to metal or silicon-carbon fiber reinforced metal heat pipes by offering a combination of low mass and improved fabricability. Titanium has been shown to have a yield strength too low at 875{degrees}K to be a useful radiator material. A silicon carbide fiber reinforced titanium material appears to have sufficient strength at 875{degrees}K. but cannot be welded due to the continuous fibers, and the preferred heat pipe working fluid (potassium) has been demonstrated to be incompatible with silicon carbide at 875{degrees}K. Moreover, titanium does not appear to be acceptable for radiators subjected to anticipated laser threats. As part of this effort, Thermacore performed composite material evaluations on combinations of refractory metals and ceramic powders. Layered composite tube samples with wall thicknesses as thin as 0.012 inches were developed. Fabrication experiments were performed that demonstrated the weldability of layered composites. Two titanium/titanium diboride composite tubes were successfully fabricated into potassium heat pipes and operated at temperatures in excess of 700{degrees}C. A hybrid composite tube was also fabricated into a potassium heat pipe. The tube was composed of alternating layers of niobium-1% zirconium foil and layers of a mixture of titanium powder and titanium diboride powder.

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180 p.

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OSTI as DE96000182

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  • Other Information: PBD: 15 Jun 1990

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  • Other: DE96000182
  • Report No.: LA-SUB--93-149
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • DOI: 10.2172/109504 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 109504
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc621761

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  • June 15, 1990

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • April 21, 2016, 9:53 p.m.

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Low-mass, intrinsically-hard high-temperature radiator. Final report, Phase I, report, June 15, 1990; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621761/: accessed October 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.