Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1998 annual progress report

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'Industrial practices in the past have resulted in contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) at many DOE sites, such as Hanford and Savannah River. Such contamination is a major problem because existing groundwater remediation technologies are expensive and difficult. An inexpensive method for groundwater remediation is greatly needed. Trees could be used to remediate CHC polluted groundwater at minimal cost (phytoremediation). Before phytoremediation can be extensively applied, the authors must determine the range of compounds that are attacked, the effects of metabolic products on the plants and the environment, and the effect of transpiration and concentration of CHC on ... continued below

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3 pages

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Strand, S.E. & Gordon, M.P. June 1, 1998.

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Description

'Industrial practices in the past have resulted in contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHCs) at many DOE sites, such as Hanford and Savannah River. Such contamination is a major problem because existing groundwater remediation technologies are expensive and difficult. An inexpensive method for groundwater remediation is greatly needed. Trees could be used to remediate CHC polluted groundwater at minimal cost (phytoremediation). Before phytoremediation can be extensively applied, the authors must determine the range of compounds that are attacked, the effects of metabolic products on the plants and the environment, and the effect of transpiration and concentration of CHC on uptake and metabolism. They will test the ability of hybrid poplar to take up and transform the chlorinated methanes, ethanes and ethylenes. The rate of uptake and transformation by poplar of TCE as a function of concentration in the soil, transpiration rate and illumination level will be determined. Methods will be developed to permit rapid testing of plants from contaminated sites for species able to oxidize and sequester chlorinated compounds. They will identify the nature of the bound residues of TCE metabolism in poplar. They will identify the mechanisms involved in CHC oxidation in poplar and use genetic manipulations to enhance that activity. They will introduce the genes for mammalian cytochrome P-450-IIE1, known to oxidize light CHCs such as TCE to attempt to increase the CHC metabolism capacity of poplar. The results of this research will place phytoremediation of CHCs on a firm scientific footing, allowing a rational assessment of its application to groundwater contamination. This report summarizes the results of the first 1.5 years of work on a three-year project.'

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3 pages

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  • Other: DE00013709
  • Report No.: EMSP-54889--98
  • Grant Number: NONE
  • DOI: 10.2172/13709 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 13709
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc621389

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • June 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Jan. 8, 2018, 4:27 p.m.

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Strand, S.E. & Gordon, M.P. Using trees to remediate groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons. 1998 annual progress report, report, June 1, 1998; Seattle, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc621389/: accessed April 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.