Subsurface structure in polished fused silica and diamond turned single crystal silicon

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The surface and near surface structure of glass and other optical materials is greatly influenced by the nature of the processes used to generate that surface. In high quality optics, the effects of process changes are often subtle and cannot be seen with conventional metrology. The presence of process induced damage in the near surface region is felt in a number of ways. Damage thresholds for optics subjected to high fluences are a particular problem in UV or high-powered laser systems. In high quality glass, the chemical and material composition of the outermost layer is influenced principally by the grinding, ... continued below

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1114 Kilobytes pages

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Carr, J W; Fearon, E; Haack, J; Hoskins, S; Hutcheon, I & Summers, L June 1, 1999.

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The surface and near surface structure of glass and other optical materials is greatly influenced by the nature of the processes used to generate that surface. In high quality optics, the effects of process changes are often subtle and cannot be seen with conventional metrology. The presence of process induced damage in the near surface region is felt in a number of ways. Damage thresholds for optics subjected to high fluences are a particular problem in UV or high-powered laser systems. In high quality glass, the chemical and material composition of the outermost layer is influenced principally by the grinding, lapping and polishing processes used in fabrication. Performance in high fluence applications is often dominated by these process-induced inhomogeneities in the first few hundred nanometers of material. Each succeeding step in a process is designed to remove the damage from the previous operation. However, any force against the surface, no matter how slight will leave evidence of damage. Fabrication processes invariably create dislocations, cracks and plastic deformation between 100 nm and 500 nm below the surface. In glass polishing, the first 100 nm is comprised of material redeposited from the polishing solution. This redeposition layer is responsible for the extremely smooth surfaces that can be generated on glass. Unfortunately, this layer also conceals many flaws present in the deeper surface regions.

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1114 Kilobytes pages

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  • American Ceramic Society 101st Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, IN (US), 04/25/1999--04/28/1999

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-134512
  • Report No.: YN0100000
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 14665
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc620858

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • June 1, 1999

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  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 2:03 p.m.

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Carr, J W; Fearon, E; Haack, J; Hoskins, S; Hutcheon, I & Summers, L. Subsurface structure in polished fused silica and diamond turned single crystal silicon, article, June 1, 1999; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620858/: accessed December 14, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.