Virtual instruments -- A Los Alamos experiment

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Changing priorities, shrinking budgets, reduced personnel, and collapsed time schedules in post-Cold War Los Alamos have forced project managers to face software ``time-to-market`` issues similar to their commercial counterparts. Programs that are funded over a period of several years are now the exception rather than the norm. Projects are much more diverse and have more clearly defined goals and termination points compared with the previous objective of incremental improvements through a series of developmental efforts. Software development and support for such projects has to be less costly than before, since the software is a ``throwaway`` when the project is over. ... continued below

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15 p.

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Khalsa, N.S. October 1, 1995.

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Description

Changing priorities, shrinking budgets, reduced personnel, and collapsed time schedules in post-Cold War Los Alamos have forced project managers to face software ``time-to-market`` issues similar to their commercial counterparts. Programs that are funded over a period of several years are now the exception rather than the norm. Projects are much more diverse and have more clearly defined goals and termination points compared with the previous objective of incremental improvements through a series of developmental efforts. Software development and support for such projects has to be less costly than before, since the software is a ``throwaway`` when the project is over. The authors came up with a wish list for a software development system that would meet their needs. The list includes: (1) higher productivity, faster turnaround than the present approach of starting from scratch in C or FORTRAN; (2) flexibility--able to make moderate changes in program flow without significant setbacks in the development schedule; (3) high-level focus--spending more time on the algorithms and less time on GUI or driver issues; (4) greater code reusability, and good mechanisms for documenting code flow and code modifications; (5) multiplatform implementations--IBM-PC, Sun, Mac, not so much for code porting but for user training issues; (6) reasonable code execution speeds--able to keep up with data acquisition rates required for the project; (7) ability to link-in external code when necessary; (8) sufficient debugging tools; (9) satisfactory product support and response times to questions (hours, not days); and (10) vital life signs from the vendor`s R and D department--upgrades, bug fixes, enhancements, response to customer feedback.

Physical Description

15 p.

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OSTI as DE96000190

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  • Digital signal processing conference and exposition, San Jose, CA (United States), 15-19 May 1995

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  • Other: DE96000190
  • Report No.: EGG--11265-5031
  • Report No.: CONF-9505286--1
  • Grant Number: AC08-93NV11265
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 106640
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc620342

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  • October 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Feb. 1, 2016, 2:18 p.m.

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Khalsa, N.S. Virtual instruments -- A Los Alamos experiment, article, October 1, 1995; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc620342/: accessed August 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.