Comparison of commercial uv lamps for radical oxidation and direct photolysis in water

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is charged with developing methods for treating contaminated sites and destroying waste organic compounds that are currently being accumulated, including Trimsol (machining oil), trichloroethene (ICE), tributyl phosphate (TBP), kerosene, and many other organics. These organics are sometimes present mixed with radioactive waste, and in these cases it is important to destroy the organics in such a way as to not increase the total volume of the waste and to ensure that no radioactivity is released in the process. Among the most promising techniques for treating aqueous mixed wastes are ultraviolet light (UV) oxidation and the ... continued below

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Haag, W. & Wang, F. T. August 1, 1999.

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is charged with developing methods for treating contaminated sites and destroying waste organic compounds that are currently being accumulated, including Trimsol (machining oil), trichloroethene (ICE), tributyl phosphate (TBP), kerosene, and many other organics. These organics are sometimes present mixed with radioactive waste, and in these cases it is important to destroy the organics in such a way as to not increase the total volume of the waste and to ensure that no radioactivity is released in the process. Among the most promising techniques for treating aqueous mixed wastes are ultraviolet light (UV) oxidation and the molten salt process, as opposed to methods like incineration or supercritical water oxidation that might lead to air emissions of radioactivity if not very carefully controlled. The purpose of the present study was to compare the energy efficiency of various commercial UV lamp systems designed for photooxidation. Two type of tests were conducted: (1) direct photolysis of a chlorinated compound and (2) photolysis of hydrogen peroxide, which is an additive often used to photooxidize compounds that are not amenable to direct photolysis. The results should allow LLNL to select the most cost-effective system for treating wastes by UV- enhanced radical oxidation processes.

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1.1 Megabytes pages

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  • Fourth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Pulsed Lasers, Tomsk (RU), 09/13/1999--09/17/1999

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-135610
  • Report No.: GJ0902000
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 13920
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc619895

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  • August 1, 1999

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  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • May 5, 2016, 9:08 p.m.

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Haag, W. & Wang, F. T. Comparison of commercial uv lamps for radical oxidation and direct photolysis in water, article, August 1, 1999; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619895/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.