Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Final report, September 1991--January 1995

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The approach in this project has been to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative processing and interpretation scheme that exploits, where possible, the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: (1) anomalous compressional and shear wave velocity; (2) Q and velocity dispersion; (3) increased velocity anisotropy; (4) amplitude vs. offset (AVO) response, and (5) variations in frequency content. As part of this the authors have attempted to refine some of the theoretical rock physics tools that should be applied in any field study to link the observed seismic signatures to the physical/geologic description of the fractured rock. The ... continued below

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107 p.

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Mavko, G. & Nur, A. January 1, 1995.

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  • Stanford University
    Publisher Info: Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
    Place of Publication: California

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Description

The approach in this project has been to integrate the principles of rock physics into a quantitative processing and interpretation scheme that exploits, where possible, the broader spectrum of fracture zone signatures: (1) anomalous compressional and shear wave velocity; (2) Q and velocity dispersion; (3) increased velocity anisotropy; (4) amplitude vs. offset (AVO) response, and (5) variations in frequency content. As part of this the authors have attempted to refine some of the theoretical rock physics tools that should be applied in any field study to link the observed seismic signatures to the physical/geologic description of the fractured rock. The project had 3 key elements: (1) rock physics studies of the anisotropic viscoelastic signatures of fractured rocks, (2) acquisition and processing of seismic reflection field data, and (3) interpretation of seismic and well log data. The study site is in a producing field operated by Amoco and Arco at the southern boundary of the Powder River basin in Wyoming. During the winter of 1992--1993 the authors collected about 50 km of 9-component reflection seismic data and obtained existing log data from several wells in the vicinity. The paper gives background information on laboratory studies, seismic field studies of fracture anisotropy, and the problem of upscaling from the laboratory to the field. It discusses fluid effects on seismic anisotropy and a method for predicting stress-induced seismic anisotropy. Then results from the field experiment are presented and discussed: regional geologic framework and site description; seismic data acquisition; shear wave data and validation; and P-wave data analysis. 106 refs., 52 figs.

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107 p.

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OSTI as DE96000555

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  • Other Information: PBD: Jan 1995

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  • Other: DE96000555
  • Report No.: DOE/MC/28087--5026
  • Grant Number: AC21-91MC28087
  • DOI: 10.2172/132681 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 132681
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc619800

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  • January 1, 1995

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  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

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  • Feb. 17, 2017, 6:04 p.m.

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Mavko, G. & Nur, A. Integrated seismic study of naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. Final report, September 1991--January 1995, report, January 1, 1995; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619800/: accessed September 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.