Flux effects on defect production and damage accumulation in cu and fe exposed to IFE-like conditions

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Radiation damage production and accumulation in solids can be divided into two stages. In the production stage, the impinging particle gradually gives off its kinetic energy to lattice atoms in the form of energetic recoils. These deposit their energy by generating secondary and higher order recoils that result in a displacement collision cascade. The outcome of this stage, of the time scale of a few to 100 picoseconds, is a population of point or clustered defects known as the primary state of damage. In the second stage, which can extend over seconds, defects that survive recombination within their nascent cascade ... continued below

Physical Description

143 Kilobytes pages

Creation Information

Alonso, E A; Caturla, M; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Perlado, J M & Stoller, R E August 26, 1999.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Radiation damage production and accumulation in solids can be divided into two stages. In the production stage, the impinging particle gradually gives off its kinetic energy to lattice atoms in the form of energetic recoils. These deposit their energy by generating secondary and higher order recoils that result in a displacement collision cascade. The outcome of this stage, of the time scale of a few to 100 picoseconds, is a population of point or clustered defects known as the primary state of damage. In the second stage, which can extend over seconds, defects that survive recombination within their nascent cascade migrate over long distances, interacting with the microstructure. These freely migrating defects (FMD) are responsible for the changes in the macroscopic properties of metals under irradiation, such as void swelling, embrittlement, radiation enhanced diffusion, etc. Such changes in mechanical properties are most often detrimental and severely limit the flexibility in materials choice and operating temperature when designing a fusion power plant. Under most conditions, such as those that would be present in a magnetic fusion energy plant, or when bombarding with fission or spallation neutrons, irradiation takes place at a certain dose rate and temperature, but in a continuous manner. However, in an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactor, or when using a pulsed neutron source such as that recently proposed by Perkins [1], the irradiation flux is pulsed and the interplay between temperature, flux and pulse frequency controls the kinetics of damage accumulation. For sufficiently low pulse frequency, and at elevated temperature where the defects migrate fast, it may be expected that annealing between pulses may result in a significantly decreased rate of damage accumulation compared to that seen under steady state conditions. On the other hand, very high neutron fluxes in the pulse itself may severely limit recombination therefore leading to extremely fast rates of damage accumulation even at elevated temperatures.

Physical Description

143 Kilobytes pages

Source

  • The First International Conference on Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications, Bordeau (FR), 09/12/1999--09/17/1999

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-135448
  • Report No.: AT6020000
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 14555
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc619379

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • August 26, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • June 16, 2015, 7:43 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 6, 2016, 1:23 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 1
Total Uses: 7

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Alonso, E A; Caturla, M; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Perlado, J M & Stoller, R E. Flux effects on defect production and damage accumulation in cu and fe exposed to IFE-like conditions, article, August 26, 1999; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc619379/: accessed September 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.